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on 7 March 2010
I have read several comments that these days perhaps Feinstein - who I consider to be the worlds top sports writer -is now writing to order and contracted to produce a book a year or whatever. However I thought this was an OK Read if a little formulaic. Difficult to keep track of all the characters but indeed - there are some interesting tales within of those who made it, those who didn't and those who never will!
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Tales from Q School has a fundamental flaw that steals most of its potential charm: Mr. Feinstein thinks he is writing Open all over again. That book was horribly flawed by lots of names and mini-biographies about people that few other than their relatives would want to read about. Tales from Q School has the same flaw . . . along with a new one: Mr. Feinstein decides to teach you everything you never wanted to know about how the format and rules have changed over the years (and repeats the key points ad nauseam throughout the text). Argh!

Q School isn't really Q School any more. It's just a series of annual golf tournaments with qualifying rounds. Depending on where you finish in the field in each round, you may or not be able to advance to the next round or to various professional tours (including the PGA tour).

Mr. Feinstein is fond of proclaiming that almost everyone had to go through Q School to make it to the PGA Tour and that everyone has a great Q School story. So why didn't he just interview 300 players from the past and present and share with us the best 100 or so stories? That would have been a great book.

Instead, he decided to write a history of the 2005 Q School. In the book, he includes a few of the older classic stories. There were also a few compelling stories that occurred during the 2005 Q School. But in between the good stories, Tales from Q School is a yawn.

So why write about Q School? First, few people other than professional golfers know much about it. Second, it's a horrible experience that causes a lot of happy and sad moments. Third, there's a lot of drama involving those who come close to qualifying as they near the end of their rounds.

Basically, Q School tests pros for their ability to play well consistently while under pressure. Most good golfers can score when there's no pressure and no gallery. But the PGA Tour has lots of pressure and enormous galleries. So it's not a bad test in that sense. Those who can stay relaxed and just play golf seem to do fine in Q School . . . but that's hardly anyone.

I would have rated the book lower if it weren't about golf. Even enjoying a few new golf stories is worth trudging through an unfortunately conceived and executed book.
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on 9 August 2009
I bought this book because I enjoyed Mr Feinstein's earlier books: A good Walk Spoiled (about the PGA Tour)and The Majors. These really seemed to get inside the life of the professional tour golfer so we could see how tough it is for them. Throughout these books the threat hanging over them was "having to go back to Q School" as though it were a prison sentence - so I was delighted to see that he had written a book about the subject.
And yes it IS tough: "three phases of hell" it says on the back cover. "Golf's Fifth Major" may be a misnomer in terms of the status - but not of effort, competitiveness or ultimate importance. At the end there is no grand trophy for the winner, but tickets for those who succeed - on the PGA Tour for the select few, or on the Nationwide Tour for the second level. For the rest: heartbreak. The threat of failure here makes many reconsider their choice of career or how to keep going until next year's Q-School. There is, inevitably, more sadness than joy in the stories told in a competition where an entire career can hang on one shot.
Another very good book which shines a light on the less glamourous side of tour golf and makes you look at professional golfers with a new respect. It also made me look at PGA Tour TV coverage with more interest and to look up the career stories of some of the less well-known names I had read about in these pages.
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Tales from Q School has a fundamental flaw that steals most of its potential charm: Mr. Feinstein thinks he is writing Open all over again. That book was horribly flawed by lots of names and mini-biographies about people that few other than their relatives would want to read about. Tales from Q School has the same flaw . . . along with a new one: Mr. Feinstein decides to teach you everything you never wanted to know about how the format and rules have changed over the years (and repeats the key points ad nauseam throughout the text). Argh!

Q School isn't really Q School any more. It's just a series of annual golf tournaments with qualifying rounds. Depending on where you finish in the field in each round, you may or not be able to advance to the next round or to various professional tours (including the PGA tour).

Mr. Feinstein is fond of proclaiming that almost everyone had to go through Q School to make it to the PGA Tour and that everyone has a great Q School story. So why didn't he just interview 300 players from the past and present and share with us the best 100 or so stories? That would have been a great book.

Instead, he decided to write a history of the 2005 Q School. In the book, he includes a few of the older classic stories. There were also a few compelling stories that occurred during the 2005 Q School. But in between the good stories, Tales from Q School is a yawn.

So why write about Q School? First, few people other than professional golfers know much about it. Second, it's a horrible experience that causes a lot of happy and sad moments. Third, there's a lot of drama involving those who come close to qualifying as they near the end of their rounds.

Basically, Q School tests pros for their ability to play well consistently while under pressure. Most good golfers can score when there's no pressure and no gallery. But the PGA Tour has lots of pressure and enormous galleries. So it's not a bad test in that sense. Those who can stay relaxed and just play golf seem to do fine in Q School . . . but that's hardly anyone.

I would have rated the book lower if it weren't about golf. Even enjoying a few new golf stories is worth trudging through an unfortunately conceived and executed book.
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on 25 October 2014
Boring, boring and then again boring. he may be a journalist bit as novellist worth 0.5
the only pages that worht to be read are the last 30 pages. there is not heart in this book
negative negative
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on 3 June 2013
good choice really pleased i bought it will be reading more from this author off to look online at other books by this author
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Tales from Q School has a fundamental flaw that steals most of its potential charm: Mr. Feinstein thinks he is writing Open all over again. That book was horribly flawed by lots of names and mini-biographies about people that few other than their relatives would want to read about. Tales from Q School has the same flaw . . . along with a new one: Mr. Feinstein decides to teach you everything you never wanted to know about how the format and rules have changed over the years (and repeats the key points ad nauseam throughout the text). Argh!

Q School isn't really Q School any more. It's just a series of annual golf tournaments with qualifying rounds. Depending on where you finish in the field in each round, you may or not be able to advance to the next round or to various professional tours (including the PGA tour).

Mr. Feinstein is fond of proclaiming that almost everyone had to go through Q School to make it to the PGA Tour and that everyone has a great Q School story. So why didn't he just interview 300 players from the past and present and share with us the best 100 or so stories? That would have been a great book.

Instead, he decided to write a history of the 2005 Q School. In the book, he includes a few of the older classic stories. There were also a few compelling stories that occurred during the 2005 Q School. But in between the good stories, Tales from Q School is a yawn.

So why write about Q School? First, few people other than professional golfers know much about it. Second, it's a horrible experience that causes a lot of happy and sad moments. Third, there's a lot of drama involving those who come close to qualifying as they near the end of their rounds.

Basically, Q School tests pros for their ability to play well consistently while under pressure. Most good golfers can score when there's no pressure and no gallery. But the PGA Tour has lots of pressure and enormous galleries. So it's not a bad test in that sense. Those who can stay relaxed and just play golf seem to do fine in Q School . . . but that's hardly anyone.

I would have rated the book lower if it weren't about golf. Even enjoying a few new golf stories is worth trudging through an unfortunately conceived and executed book.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Tales from Q School has a fundamental flaw that steals most of its potential charm: Mr. Feinstein thinks he is writing Open all over again. That book was horribly flawed by lots of names and mini-biographies about people that few other than their relatives would want to read about. Tales from Q School has the same flaw . . . along with a new one: Mr. Feinstein decides to teach you everything you never wanted to know about how the format and rules have changed over the years (and repeats the key points ad nauseam throughout the text). Argh!

Q School isn't really Q School any more. It's just a series of annual golf tournaments with qualifying rounds. Depending on where you finish in the field in each round, you may or not be able to advance to the next round or to various professional tours (including the PGA tour).

Mr. Feinstein is fond of proclaiming that almost everyone had to go through Q School to make it to the PGA Tour and that everyone has a great Q School story. So why didn't he just interview 300 players from the past and present and share with us the best 100 or so stories? That would have been a great book.

Instead, he decided to write a history of the 2005 Q School. In the book, he includes a few of the older classic stories. There were also a few compelling stories that occurred during the 2005 Q School. But in between the good stories, Tales from Q School is a yawn.

So why write about Q School? First, few people other than professional golfers know much about it. Second, it's a horrible experience that causes a lot of happy and sad moments. Third, there's a lot of drama involving those who come close to qualifying as they near the end of their rounds.

Basically, Q School tests pros for their ability to play well consistently while under pressure. Most good golfers can score when there's no pressure and no gallery. But the PGA Tour has lots of pressure and enormous galleries. So it's not a bad test in that sense. Those who can stay relaxed and just play golf seem to do fine in Q School . . . but that's hardly anyone.

I would have rated the book lower if it weren't about golf. Even enjoying a few new golf stories is worth trudging through an unfortunately conceived and executed book.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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