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VINE VOICEon 28 March 2009
I'm not sure about this one. As usual with Mary Balogh it was a well written tale but this time it didn't read as smoothly as usual for me and I'll try and analyze why....

I don't particularly mind that it was not action packed nor was it full of anguish and big misunderstandings. It was a gentle romance and I always love a story about a marriage of convenience that turns into a love match.

What I didn't like: The seduction scene in Vauxhall gardens at the beginning went far too far to be realistic. I found Katherine's constant preaching to the hero about love and the meaning of love irritating. In parts the book was far too wordy and I found myself skimming pages - it could have been edited down without losing too much of the main story and perhaps it would have benefitted and flowed better - it was all a bit laborious. "Dash it" and "By Jove" thought by the hero when he surprises himself by getting all sentimental about her - OK he's denying to himself that he could possibly have finer feelings but the point was stressed too much in my view and those phrases grated. There were too many Mary Balogh clichés - the naked swimming in the lake; the country fete for the locals at the hero's country house (the Plumed Bonnet and others - if it's not a summer fete then it's a Christmas party followed by a ball). In fact there generally too many obvious similarities and qualities reminiscent of characters and plots found in her other books. There was also too much re-capping of the background family story in case anyone hadn't read the previous book which I also found annoying and repetitive and clumsily done.

The love story was sweet but it didn't drag me along with it. There were too many annoyances for me to get very deeply involved. The overall feeling I had was that the writing was too contrived and too self-conscious. I'll still read all the rest of the books in this series but I do hope they get better.
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on 28 May 2013
I can only repeat my review of other Mary Balogh books.
She has the ability to relate a gentle tales of romance.
One inevitably feels the need to keep turning the page to discover what happens next.
Her use of the English language and grammar is admirable.
Far too many other Romance writers and their editors fail to follow her example.

The reader inevitably continues turning the pages and when the last page is concluded,
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on 11 July 2014
What can I say? She's done it again! A lovely story that had me grinning, especially at the end. It's great to get to know the other characters from the first novel and see how their lives turn out. And I always love a reformed rake!
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on 21 March 2013
Review taken from my blog in November 2010 (#33)after borrowing it from the local library:

This is the first time that I have flirted with this new author, and as with all new friendships/loves there is a certain amount of steps back and forth and round and round to assess whether you will both suit.

In the end I think that we suited very well indeed. Certainly less raunchy than the other ladies work recently, but charming and entertaining no less.

Another series of works based around a family, the Huxtables', but not the first book in the particular series.

After a night of drunken revelry to celebrate his 25th birthday, notorious gamester and womaniser Jasper Finlay (Baron Mountford) gambles that he can seduce an innocent and virtuous woman into full intercourse within a fortnight. The poor unfortunate woman named in White's gambling book is Miss Katherine Huxtable.

He engineers a meeting with them, and sets to seduce her fully against a tree, but for some reason gets cold feet and withdraws, and takes the consequences at the club. He then retires to his estate to lick his wounds for a year of so.

Meanwhile, whilst avoiding the possible scandal, Katherine retires from public life for three years.

They eventually meet again in London and they decide on a joint only wager to make the other fall in love with them. All goes sadly awry and Katherine's reputation is ruined when the original bet becomes very public knowledge.

To avoid the scandal they are forced to marry and the prizes becomes nothing less than both of their hearts.

Exceedingly well written and thoroughly enjoyable.

4 stars ****.
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on 6 June 2011
couldnt put it down. it had been a while since i had read the previous book so the recapping for me was actually a help rather than a hindrance. jasper is a wild man about town and he gets himself into a wager which will be his downfall. his intended target katherine huxtable who is more than a match for him as he pursues her intent on winning his wager. but he comes to his senses and doesnt follow through on it but they are both linked by the experience. 3 years later fate brings them togther and this time its for good. i liked the fete part of the story as it brings all the loose ends of the story together in a fun way. great story, great characters. cant wait for the next one!
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on 27 January 2009
A new Mary Balogh book is always something to look forward to, especially when a new series is released in consecutive months. 'Then Comes Seduction' follows 'First Comes Love' which focused on the middle sister of the Huxtable family, Vanessa, who found love after a marriage of convenience.

'Then Comes Seduction' has, in some aspects, a similar overall theme. In this story love comes after marriage, but the marriage isn't that of convenience but one that is required when a scandal brews. Katherine Huxtable knows that Jasper Finley, Baron Montford, is a rake, but he's an amusing conversation partner and rather handsome with it. However when he leads her into a side path at Vauxhall and introduces her to passion, he informs her it is all because of a wager - that he can seduce her within a fortnight. Something in Montford's conscience means that he doesn't go through with the seduction but they are both so embarrassed by the episode that they avoid each other for the next three years.

However, when they meet again and Jasper's young half sister Charlotte takes a shine to Katherine and her sister Meg, they are thrown together. Unfortunately, the social world knows that Montford is a rake who never shows any partiality for ladies of quality, and a scheming relative may see a way to hurt Jasper. When marriage is the only option, both Jasper and Katherine fear their future. Can she survive in a marriage with a man who will not love? Can he ever overcome his awful childhood with an unloving and cold stepfather?

As always with a Balogh book this is well written with in-depth characters, some moments of lightness as well as some of high emotion. Montford perhaps seemed fairly unrakish after the first few chapters, and Katherine's naïveté wasn't always that appealing. I also found the initial seduction scene unconvincing, I was sure that she would have put a stop to events before they got to the situation they were in, but this was a minor quibble within a book that otherwise I enjoyed, particularly the vignettes into life in the country and putting on a fête for local villagers.

Originally published for Curled Up With A Good Book © Helen Hancox 2009
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on 4 December 2010
'Then Comes Seduction' is the second book in the Huxtable Family series by Mary Balogh. I read the first one recently, and wasn't very impressed, as the female protagonist, Vanessa Dew, nee Huxtable, was irritating. However, I decided to read the second book in the series, since it is not about Vanessa anymore. The story centres around Katherine Huxtable, the youngest of the the family. She is a beauty who has had many male admirers, but held out for love. One day at a ball, she meets Jasper Finley, Baron Montford, who has a reputation of being a rake. There is an instant attraction, and during a walk outside, things become frisky. She is at this point, unaware he has made a wager with his friends that he can seduce her. But it is Montford who stops himself before anything happens and he confesses to the wager. They part ways, only to meet again three years later. When their 'frisky' encounter comes to light, everyone believes Katherine pushed Montford away, due to his 'rakish' past. A wedding is practically forced on them to save their reputations. After the wedding night, he makes a wager with Katherine that he can make her fall in love with him. She accepts and believes she will win and make him fall in love with her. But in the end, all wagers are off when they discover what their own feelings really are.

I much prefer this book to it's predecessor "First Comes Marriage." Katherine is not an irritable character, unlike Vanessa, who really bugged me. She appears in this story too, but not very often, thank goodness. I am already on Book 3 of the Huxtable series, "At Last Comes Love," following Margaret Huxtable (the eldest) and her story and enjoying that too.

4.5/5!
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on 19 January 2009
A new Mary Balogh book is always something to look forward to, especially when a new series is released in consecutive months. 'Then Comes Seduction' follows 'First Comes Love' which focused on the middle sister of the Huxtable family, Vanessa, who found love after a marriage of convenience.

'Then Comes Seduction' has, in some aspects, a similar overall theme. In this story love comes after marriage, but the marriage isn't that of convenience but one that is required when a scandal brews. Katherine Huxtable knows that Jasper Finley, Baron Montford, is a rake, but he's an amusing conversation partner and rather handsome with it. However when he leads her into a side path at Vauxhall and introduces her to passion, he informs her it is all because of a wager - that he can seduce her within a fortnight. Something in Montford's conscience means that he doesn't go through with the seduction but they are both so embarrassed by the episode that they avoid each other for the next three years.

However, when they meet again and Jasper's young half sister Charlotte takes a shine to Katherine and her sister Meg, they are thrown together. Unfortunately, the social world knows that Montford is a rake who never shows any partiality for ladies of quality, and a scheming relative may see a way to hurt Jasper. When marriage is the only option, both Jasper and Katherine fear their future. Can she survive in a marriage with a man who will not love? Can he ever overcome his awful childhood with an unloving and cold stepfather?

As always with a Balogh book this is well written with in-depth characters, some moments of lightness as well as some of high emotion. Montford perhaps seemed fairly unrakish after the first few chapters, and Katherine's naïveté wasn't always that appealing. I also found the initial seduction scene unconvincing, I was sure that she would have put a stop to events before they got to the situation they were in, but this was a minor quibble within a book that otherwise I enjoyed, particularly the vignettes into life in the country and putting on a fête for local villagers.

Originally published for Curled Up With A Good Book © Helen Hancox 2009
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on 20 December 2012
This is the sort of book you begin to read and find you can not put the book down. You want to get to the end, when you get there you wish it would go on a bit more
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