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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
346
4.4 out of 5 stars
Format: Hardcover|Change
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on 25 November 2013
A fascinating addition to my cookery books - a book to browse and rethink existing recipes. Heard about it on radio.
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on 19 May 2013
The book is no food bible, but it's a good start. Segnit explains what it's for and how she devised it and therefore how the reader should take it and use it. That helped tremendously and it's a beautiful thing to have and dip into.
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on 27 November 2013
Viewed online. Wanted to buy copy as Christmas gift, bought two copies so that I could keep one for myself!
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on 26 September 2011
Very pleased with this book. The design, look and feel of this book is wonderful (believe me, it's what I do for a living). The presentation of all the information is easy to use, and endlessly fascinating. I can think of many friends that would love this book, so I may well be purchasing a few more copies as gifts so my copy doesn't keep disappearing! Highly recommended.
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on 23 August 2010
This book is an OK good read, but for a reference book on what ingredients go with what the book Culinary Artistry by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page is much much better. I would recommend buying Culinary Artistry before this book for its informationon not just ingredients but on menu design and lots of information from top chefs on how they come up with dishes and menus.
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on 2 January 2012
This was recommended by Greg Wallace and John Torode of Masterchef and I bought it as a Christmas present for my Mum. She loved it and is reading it daily. It's reputation is far-reaching. She told others about it and they knew of it and were determined to get a copy, having heard how brilliant it is. It's a small book but is packed with information, with lots of ideas around flavours etc.
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on 8 August 2010
A useful reference work to dip into when planning a new recipe or inventing something new to produce in your kitchen.
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on 9 January 2016
Brilliant book for cooks that love to create and not follow receipes
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on 10 June 2013
The delivery on the book was prompt and the book was in perfect condition. The only reason I haven't given it 5 is because it was a present for someone so I haven't actually read the book myself so can't comment on how good it is.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 5 August 2010
I've largely given up buying recipe books as not only do I have too many already, but also because there's been a lurch toward novelty in flavour combinations at the expense of things that really work. I saw a review that praised this Flavour Thesarus by a food writer that I respect, Elizabeth Luard, and so thought I'd give it a try. I'm so glad I did as it's a cornucopia of good ideas, old favourites and anecdotes that flesh out the history of some of the pairings of foods. What was a delightful surprise, and adds to my enjoyment of the book, is the author's divergent sense of humour in some of her descriptions that made me laugh out loud.

This book doesn't attempt to be comprehensive like The Oxford Companion to Food (Oxford Companions) so tends to lump classes of foods together, e.g., "blue cheeses" where, say, Rochfort, Gorgonzola, Danish Blue and Stilton are very different in what pairs with them best, particularly which wines suit. The Flavour Thesaurus doesn't delve into what foods and wines go well together: a topic tackled by Wine with Food: The Ultimate Guide to Matching Wine with Food for Every Occasion: a book I would recommend, though it's a complex topic that involves personal taste preferences and fine tuning of the particular grape variety/wine-grower/vintage/way you cook that all make such a difference to the flavour chemistry as it hits the palate. A very enjoyable journey can be had exploring all these variables!
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