Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle The Grand Tour Prize Draw Learn more Shop Women's Shop Men's



on 6 September 2017
I bought this book to help me write an essay on handmade design in the current world. The book unexpectedly really helped me to understand why it is that I love crafting and how craft and handmade design are just as relevant today as they have ever been. Easy to read and full of interesting ideas and information.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 December 2016
Really good book, so interesting!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 August 2013
I like the positive attitude to society developments. Very refreshing. Emphasises the satisfaction of creativity. I have pupils who have responded to a question in class about what is good about doing hard work yourself, instead of always taking the easy way out and copying others - and got the answer "self-confidence and happiness". This is a book which shows why it's true.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 June 2013
Great book - read it from cover to cover. For anyone who rejects art for arts sake, or who wants a refreshing approach to making and creativity, this is a must
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 26 April 2011
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This is an exciting book on an interesting and relevant subject, belied, I think, by a dull title, "Making is connecting". But what could David Gauntlett do with the wide subject he was trying to cover?

The compass of this book is vast, so I homed in on something I know, namely, "knitting", intrigued that this even has a mention, however, its inclusion is clarified by a quote from Joanne Turney in her book, "The Culture of Knitting".

Joanne says that knitting "offers a means of creativity, of confidence in one's own ability to "do", as well as occupying a space in which one can just "be".

This is amplified by the comment on the back of the book, that, "Gauntlett offers a terrific account of how creativity, craft and community intersect in the 21st Century" - [Clay Shirky, author of "Here Comes Everybody"].

Not surprisingly, in the sweep of David Gauntlett's vision of present trends, a parallel is drawn to William Morris and the Arts and Crafts movement. He demonstrates how the contemporary interest in DIY and the "handmade", can be viewed as a resurgence of the arts and crafts ethos in this present century.

As already a part of the "make do and mend" generation - my mother was born 1903, and I was born just after the WWII - I don't know how much I am part of this revolution of independence from reliance on the world of consumerism - but I do know I am in sympathy with it.

Fashioning Technology: A DIY Intro to Smart Crafting (Craft: Projects)William Morris: A Life for Our Time
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 7 September 2011
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
A comprehensive look at the whole maelstrom of how the internet has effectively changed the way we connect in every sphere related to creative endeavours. In effect, this doesnt just look at the obvious suspects such as youtube et al, but also the pre and post effects and indeed conseqeunces of internet useage in terms of its sociological effects on a global scale.

Ive not given it the full 5 out of 5 simply because there are places where the whole thing seems too arrid and stodgy as a rhetorical assimilation of some brilliant ideas and concepts, both past and present. Also, its something that can't be left on the table or in the bag, as it were, and just picked up after reading a chapter here and here over a lengthy period of time, due to the quite intense nature of the constructs given, which require cross referencing on occasion; it isnt anything you could call a "dip in" book . However, these are minor criticisms, which for me translate as something else entirely; it would be great to see and hear this book as some sort of documentary or live presentation in a venue, for which the prose style is VERY suited.

Overall, a recommended read.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 28 April 2011
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This book explores "the social meaning of creativity, from DIY and knitting to YouTube and Web2.0".

In fact it begins before DIY (but after knitting) with insights about "craft" from Victorian thinkers John Ruskin and William Morris. They were critics of the new industrialization and what it did to the world of making, of manufacture. And more specifically, what it did to those workers caught up in the industrial process which denied any individual creativity to the worker who was there to aid the machines in making predesigned product.

The author extends this discussion to emphasize the importance and value of "making" in everyday life, and how new technologies are taking the making and distribution of creative work out of the hands solely of professionals. And the various ways in which this is a good thing.

Throughout the discussion Gauntlett leads the reader through some very stimulating and critical arguments, ideas and research from a wide range of sources including his own. The discussion is always balanced, weighing counter-arguments throughout. It is very clearly presented, with plenty of signposting to help the reader follow the argument making this an easy and involving read.

I now feel like I've had a bit of a crash-course in cutting-edge Media and Communications Studies. Has made me think about my life in a different way.

Highly recommended, even to www skeptics!
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 April 2015
Very interesting.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 30 May 2011
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
As the author states "This book is built on a broad general understanding that people are happier, more engaged in the world, and more likely to develop and learn, when they are doing or making things for themselves, rather than having things done and made for them" The book is a clarion call for creativity, for craftsmanship and social connection. 'Making is connecting' is its key phase.
That being said, the book is a delight to read. David Gauntlett's style is highly accessible, yet very thorough. Each new concept is defined carefully, everyday examples are given, and plenty of opportunity is given for extra research. It should be included in every booklist for students of communications, media studies, sociology, general studies, and modern politics. Teachers will also be delighted to use it as a 'dip-in' resource book. If this isn't enough, more information is actually provided on a web site.
I finished the book wanting to sign-up for David Gauntlett's courses. My only quibble is that his argument would have been better served if he had used Twitter rather than Facebook as an example of an online interactive service. Maybe next time...
33 Comments| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 April 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
The basic premiss of this book is that people are happier and more involved and engaged with the people around them and generally across the world, and thus more likely to grow, evolve, develop and progress when creating, doing or making things for themselves, as opposed to than having everything served to them or made for them. It is an interesting and relatively novel concept, easy to read and follow, with a writing style and prose that is both easy and enjoyable. The layout is nicely laid out, with a logical structure and format, explaining/defining each new concept and littering with common and sensible examples. The authour goes further and puts this into perspective of the electronic age that we live in and the challenges and rewards herein.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)