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Customer reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
6


on 9 August 2004
In 'Ms. Midshipwoman Harrington' Weber offers a view of Harrington's early career after the fashion of Forester's 'Hornblower' series in the style we have all come to love. Although Harrington's apparent inability to do anything wrong does become unbelievable at times, this is nevertheless a hugely enjoyable story.
'Changer of Worlds' offers a fascinating and thought-provoking insight into the treecat society, and also allows the reader to examine the characters of Nimitz/Laughs Brightly and Samantha/Golden Voice in a way that would be impossible within the structure of one of the full-length novels with Harrington as the focaliser.
'From The Highlands' was an adequate story, but when combined in a collection with such strong stories this was a let-down. Although not bad, this novella failed to capture my imagination and dragged on for far longer than I felt was necessary.
'Nightfall' was a huge disappointment for me, as it was simply an extract from one of the full-length novels, when I had been anticipating a new piece of work. I don't recall which novel it was, but the short story re-tells the attempted 'disappearance' of Esther McQueen by the Havenite government and her resulting coup over Fontein and Saint-Just.
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on 26 March 2001
I greatly enjoyed reading the short stories in this book. From David Weber, we see Honor Harrington's first command, while Eric Flint's story, which takes up approximately half of the book does not jar with the universe we have already visited (for a lesson on how not to do it, see 'Drakas'). This story shows what happens when a group of slavers come up against a very angry Manticoran officer and a number of officers of the People's Republic of Haven who are not the bad guys (even the ones in the SS). The insight into treecat culture in David Weber's second story is also enjoyable, as is finding out who Sam really is (same story). I can strongly recommend this book to anyone who has read any of the other Honor Harrington stories.
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on 4 December 2016
Starts off and I'm thinking it's just standard fare then we find out that maybe humanity isn't alone and we learn the Tree cats name for a certain central character!
The last story is a humdinger!
Be prepared as it will shock you!!!
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on 16 September 2013
Excellent reading because it fills in 'gaps' in the honour Harrington universe. HIghly recommended. Pity the Kindle price is so high though.
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on 4 January 2016
same old.......
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on 28 August 2016
Great Stories
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