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3.9 out of 5 stars
102
3.9 out of 5 stars
An Appeal to Reason: A Cool Look at Global Warming
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on 6 July 2014
Nigel Lawson's key premise is not that global warming is a cult (it is) but that if it is occurring the world should take practical steps to mitigate or prevent its impact. With the current progression of world development the green energy plank is not a practical solution for many decades so it is far better to plan expenditure for adaptation.
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on 1 October 2014
At last - Sound Commonsense prevails !
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on 28 December 2014
As described
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on 2 February 2016
See headline
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on 29 August 2014
Should be read by all those who want to keep an open mind about global warming. Lawson is vilified as a climate change denier but he actually makes a compelling case for seeing climate change as an economic challenge. He is prepared to stick his head above the parapet and challenge the accepted orthodoxy. It makes no sense to shut down the world economy to prevent climate change. Doing so will condemn those already living in poverty to a very bleak future. He argues that we should support economic growth and use our wealth to mitigate the effects of climate change. Well written and persuasive.
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on 20 August 2013
Although now a few years old the arguments presented in this book are just as apposite today. It lays out the issues very well.
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on 12 August 2015
Well written and researched. He does not say global warming isn't happening but he does challenge the voracity of the science. Most of all he questions the quasi-religous ferver that is associated with the subject and how debate is being stifled by denying any platform to those who challenge the 'perceived wisdom'! Furthermore he questions the 'science' as to what might be achieved in stopping or slowing down global warming, the vast amounts of money being spent and the questionable methods being used, and finally the potential futility of what it is hoped to achieve. Certainly makes one think seriously that this has become more political than science and ultimately who or what is driving the agenda and why.
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on 23 June 2014
This is by far the best "sceptic" book on the subject, I put inverted commas because the author declares that he accepts the majority scientific view on AGW and admits he's not a scientist and is in no position to argue otherwise, but his principle skepticism is of how we handle it.

This sets his book apart from much of the mad ravings of the climate change deniers who don't even recognize that man is responsible for the 40% increase in atmospheric CO2 (this is 100% provable due to the particular carbon isotopes from fossil fuel combustion present in the 'new' CO2 that's measured in the atmosphere, and also quite simply from historical records of coal and oil production/consumption).

In a nutshell, the authors argument boils down to:

There's a good chance AGW will be beneficial, we've plenty of time to adapt, and future generations will be much richer and able to deal with it anyway.

Basically he's an optimist.

He does however recognize the risk of catastrophic global warming, where positive feedbacks could put us on a slippery slope to a climate similar to the planet Venus, and does advocate a carbon tax instead of cap and trade (which he describes as a scam), and geo-engineering (putting aerosols into the stratosphere to block sunlight) as an emergency measure.

A few things that irritated me about this book however was the authors constant and mostly unqualified use of the word 'ubsurd' to dismiss many genuine concerns and in particular renewable energy. He states that the UK achieving 20% of its electricity from renewables is "beyond credibility", and yet Scotland now gets over 30% of its electricity from renewables, and Portugal gets over 50%.

Also, his suggestion that we could be giving kids food poisoning by not having a dishwasher and washing dishes in hand-hot water was his 'let them eat cake' moment in this book. Does he think everyone in the UK can afford and has the space for a dishwasher at home?
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on 31 December 2016
given as gift
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on 10 April 2015
Perfect. No problems
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