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on 6 October 2002
On first opening this book I was amazed by the sheer variety of the photos it contains. 'Heaven & Earth' covers everything from the smallest to the largest objects in the known universe in gorgeously detailed, full-page pictures. From Carbon-dioxide crystals to supernovae the photos are presented in one of four sections according to the size of the subject.
Each photo is accompanied by a brief but interesting description of the processes behind each photo written by a highly qualified science journailst.
I chose this book hoping it would be similar to Arthus-Bertrand's excellent 'Earth from the Air...'. In fact 'Heaven & Earth' is in my opinion a better buy, due to the variety of subjects the photos cover and the fascinating image captions. Unlike 'Earth from the Air...' there is almost no repetition of the subjects for the photos.
In short, this is a book that has photos to interest absolutely anyone and would be a perfect christmas / birthday present. Or you could use it to keep the relatives quietly absorbed for a while!
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on 19 May 2017
Good book bought for bright ten year old to study. Done same for 3 others. We got one years ago.
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on 28 July 2006
I was completely amazed with this book. It really is fascinating getting a different perspective on everyday objects and I spent hours looking at all the photographs: the photo quality is excellent. The book makes an ideal present for anyone interested in either science or photography and you can go through it page by page or dip into it whenever you have a moment.
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on 17 May 2003
This book is astounding in everyway. It takes you on a journey from the subatomic to the unimaginably immense. The pictures in this book are second to non, it is perfect for stiking up conversation when you have visitors. I was bought this book for christmas and could not have asked for a better present. Anybody with the slightest interest in science will love this book, even my mum loved it!
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on 1 April 2017
I absolutely love this book. The premise is obviously an intriguing one, take the photos/visualisations of the smallest things in the universe, and end looking at the universes largest (ie collections of galaxies).

It is very much a coffee table book, but its a great one for anyone who likes the visual, and perhaps finds science on its own a bit dry without being able to see the results, so its a particularly useful one for anyone wanting to help kids get into science. The quality of the pictures is exceptional and the book is of a very high quality. The annotations for each picture are both concise, yet while also being very interesting and accessible. I bought this book some years ago now, and may be buying another, because my current one is starting to become very worn!
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 18 August 2011
Almost entirely composed of photos- amazing microscopic shots of a butterfly wing,limescale, snail's teeth...aerial shots of river deltas and icebergs...and to me the least interesting section on outer space. A really intriguing book to pick up and peruse but I dont know if you'd go back to it much after an initial browse
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on 28 February 2009
This is a superb book of images. The hidden beauty revealed through magnification makes creation even more amazing. The whole family from the children to the grandchildren enjoyed studying page after page.A great table book to delight all. I found inspiration in the colours and forms of the images for future art work.For me a helpful resource book.I recommend it highly.
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on 10 November 2012
I bought this book as inspiration for colour and pattern as I am studying illustration, and it is now one of my favourites. It's quite compact but it's thick and the images are a good size, almost filling each page with just a small, precise description at the side. The photos are truly beautiful. Starting off with detailed microscopic images of atoms, particles,DNA and viruses the image subjects increase in size and go right the way through to nebulae and galaxies.
One of my favourite sections of this book (about halfway through) is the satellite images of different places on earth - fault lines,valleys,rivers and mountain ranges are photographed in way that makes them truly fascinating, some look as if they could be abstract expressionist paintings. This book really lets you see the world in a different light, I would reccomend it to everyone - well worth the money :)
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on 27 June 2009
I agree with the other five star awarding reviewers; this small book contains a diverse range of fabulous natural history photographs. Each photograph is described in a concise paragraph of interesting, informative text which is so often missing from other collections of photographs. My only slight complaint is that the type face used is to small for my ageing eyes. In short this publication is well worth the money asked for it.
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on 6 March 2003
The picture quality is fantastic, if you want something to just flick through, this is perfect. not much to actually read however, each picture only has a sentance or so each. fantastic value for money
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