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on 4 August 2013
Well - this book is of course brilliant and always has been. The most important elements for me are that this book has not been messed with and has all the original text unlike some previous versions - and that it's in algebraic which I find far more easy to read than descriptive notation.
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VINE VOICEon 27 July 2010
I remember picking up this book when I first became interested in chess in the late 80s. Chess books were dull and dusty and there was a lot of focus on classical players from the romantic era. This read like a breath of fresh air with verve and Fischer's emotion evident in the narrative. Of course there were probably anthologies of the Soviet greats but these were hard to come by, and in Russian of course. I thought for a while in the 90s that I should have stole that book from the library because it became out of print...

These games show Fischer at his best from weak opponents to the strongest in the world at the time all at various stages of his "professional" career. Fisher managed to create "classics" and textbook examples used in chess instruction books since and it is valuable to hear his own insights as well as the peers who were commentating on the game at the time. This is the thrust of the selling point, and it is well justified.

Here are my other thoughts.

1) Up until Fisher, opening theory and strategy was not as well developed so pre-Fischer you are much more liable to get games with opening errors and strategic misjudgement. Tal secured many a victory with unsound sacrifices, Petrosian secured equality from bad positions with depth of thought and prophylaxis. Spassky was an accomplished attacker but tended to be self optimistic to the point of disregarding certain aspects of position. Fischer at his peak was the cold hard calculator that the best foundered upon. I also will mention his analysis without computers for me was easier to grasp and something to aspire to. Compare this to the reams of sidelines of latter day books.

2) Fischer 2-3 years pre Championship had the reputation of finding the most practical "correct moves" from opening to endgame. He was the ultimate complete player of his time: able to sacrifice for the attack or prosecute positional nuances to their conclusion. The modern grandmaster has his forerunner in Fischer.

3) While the theory of the Spanish, Sicilian and KID have moved on, it is worthwhile revisiting the basic plans that Fischer used to fashion these openings into weapons of choice.

I would recommend that this is a logical starting point for any student of the game, or someone who wants to build their anthology of games. Pritchett's Heroes of Classical Chess and of course Kasparov's My Great Predecessors vol 4 are present to flesh out Fischer's body of work. The theory may be a bit stale and many books have provided a more entertaining method of conveying their ideas but "My 60 Memomarable Games" was what started it all for me.
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on 26 January 2012
A collection of games annotated by the most charismatic chess player of all time. Some of the most interesting games are the ones that Fischer lost, in particular to Tal. A must-have for any chess player.
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on 21 April 2015
Great chess games . Brilliant annotations to moves by Fischer
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on 31 May 2005
This is my favourite chess book. Bobby Fischer, the American genius, talks the reader through 60 of his games, describing his thoughts, the intricacies behind strategies, the tactical justification of moves and the psychological battle in each one. Expect to see beautifully simple positional play next to out of this world combinations that are just breathtaking (see "The Game of the Century", played by a 15 year old Fischer against Byrne). Fischer played nearly all of these games as a grandmaster so they are of a very high level, but his lucid commentary makes every move and idea both accessible and understandable. Every player will learn huge amounts from this book, it is essential for each chess enthusiast, competitor and professional.
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on 19 October 2014
I have only played through a couple of the games so far, but it is instructive to have bobby Fishers commentary as the game progresses.

It demonstrates the inadequacy of my own chess ability. I only hope I will improve from the knowledge and tactics imparted by the master!
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on 10 May 2013
Bobby Fischer was a genius and these games prove it and give me a chance to learn from a master chess player!
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on 14 May 2016
Whilst the book is a chess classic this Kindle edition is rubbish since it doesn't show either a symbol or a letter to denote piece moves!
For example 1.e4 c5 2.f3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 - this could easily be considered as all pawn moves when 2.f3 should read 2.Nf3.
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on 18 April 2011
I wouldn't say that this is a better book than _My System_ or _Masters of the Chessboard_. I wouldn't
even say that it's better than Fine's _Basic Chess Endgames_. But whether or not you decide that this
is the book for you, at this stage of your climb up the ladder, it is still the greatest book ever
written about chess, and you should know that. The annotations don't overwhelm the reader with forests
of variations, and they don't try to pass off platitudes as profundities. Somehow, between Scylla and Charybdis,
they tell the reader just what is needed to go to the next level in understanding what
was at issue, in the concrete position on the board, at that moment. (Also, their assessments are generally
confirmed by modern day engines.) Fischer was a person of intense honesty and integrity -- later this was more
than he himself could endure -- but there is nothing emotionally disjointed in this book. There has never been
a more direct and insightful rendering of the mentality of a top grandmaster.
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on 21 June 2010
Wow. Somebody needs to put up a five-star review of this book: so here goes.

This is a great book, one of the greatest chess books ever written. I devoured this book as a kid (in the old descriptive notation), and highly commend this to any one today.

It's not just that Fischer was a great player, arguably the greatest of all time. He was also a great chess writer: interesting, clear, simple, and instructive.

This is one of a handful of books that is simply a must-read for any player hoping to improve their chess. If you want to learn how to launch an attack, you need to study Fischer closely: one of the all-time great masters of attack. A careful reading of this book will probably teach you more about modern chess strategy than Nimzovich's classic "My System." It will probably teach you more about endgames than most modern endgame manuals.

As with most game collections, you need to go through it line by line, and ask yourself at each point: what is the best move?--and then see what Fischer actually played. When you get to a move that Fischer analyzes in detail, you need to set aside the book, write out your analysis, and then compare your analysis with his. This book is the perfect follow-up book for anyone who has read Silman's "How to Reassess Your Chess" or Kotov's "Think Like A Grandmaster".
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