Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more

Customer reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
8


on 2 June 1999
Jon Winokur, author of the divinely wicked Portable Curmudgeon, has compiled what amounts to the ultimate literary seminar for an aspiring writer. It's filled with advice from Russell Banks, Kurt Vonnegut, Peter Mayle and all the other literary stars you search for on Amazon.com and as a bonus you get Winokur's trademark wit. A perfect gift for all the liberal arts major graduates on your list.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 24 June 1999
Advice to Writers is Jon Winokur's finest book -- and that's saying something. Its already pulled me out of writer's block several times. I mean, its not exactly a self-help book, but the damn thing WORKS.
As a writer who suffers from chronic indolence, I'm keeping this book on my bedside table (since I'm indolent I work in bed) -- it makes me WANT to write.
Practical usage aside, its big fun, too. No one else has Winokur's delicious eye for quotes and their juxtapositions. This lovely book is caviar; all other "advice to writer" books are neurasthenic by comparison.
Bravo, Mr. Winokur, and thank you! When's the next one?
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 9 July 1999
For those of us familiar with Mr Winokur's literary tourbooks, Advice To Writers represents a welcome refuge and a haven of information regarding the literary bugaboos we all experience in our efforts to create a representative sampling of intelligence that would have value, in some form or fashion, to someone else - anyone else - for that matter.
And isn't it wonderful to know that our most frustrating issues were experienced by and dealt with by our most astonishing and enduring literary heroes.
Thanks to Mr. Winokur for providing us with the looking glass as we hopefully learn through the inciteful pain and suffering of the "literary lights" we so hope to emulate.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 18 May 1999
As a writer and teacher of creative nonfiction, I hunger for a glimpse into the interior lives of authors. Do they feel as out of control or depressed as I sometimes do when facing a huge project? Do they suffer from writer's envy or writer's block? Finally, do they drink as much as I do?
Winokur's book is satisfying and addictive. By offering actual quotes from working writers, he manages to show the amazing breadth and depth of the torturous creative experience. Writing is more of a chronic condition than a profession: think of Advice to Writers as a self-help mental health book for the ink-stained wretches of the world.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 28 May 1999
Books about writing are usually self-important and affected. This one isn't.
Winokur dissects the writer's life and shows that it isn't all art and inspiration. He covers the nuts and bolts of publshing-from punctuation and plagiarism to literary prizes. But he also has a section on the creative process. Advice to Writers includes just about every kind of writer--journalists, humorists, historians, and sports writers--who all share their pithy wisdom on the business and craft of writing.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 10 May 1999
I suppose I should have expected that, in a book made up of other people's words, there would not be a lot of originality. Still, I was hoping for a book that did more than skim the surface of the issues facing a writer. The section on genres was particularly weak, which is a pity. Best to go back to the classics: Strunk & White, EM Forster, John Gardner. Disappointing.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 1 August 1999
I loved this book. It made me want to sit down and write the Great American Novel.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 1 July 1999
Jon Winokur spent no time trying to find the best quotes, the most pithy, or insightful quotes. He just picked enough quotes to fill his quota. I read though the book and was completely bored. The quotes have no flare. They aren't memorable. None of them even made a post-it on my monitor.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)