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on 29 March 2017
Excellent
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on 7 November 2015
A play that should be a compulsory read!
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on 12 September 2017
Brilliant work from a brilliant man. I may not agree with his political views, but I can certainly see the connection between hell and other people.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 27 May 2011
This is the best lit that Sartre produced. He was one of the first "intellectuals" who I dutifully followed like I did Rock Stars once their original groups broke up: once I found something good, I sought more and was continually disappointed. That is not a criticism of the plays as they are here, but of the man in a wider context.

No Exit is a great masterpiece of European literature, with echoes of modernism, surrealism, and the theatre of the absurd. I did not think it was all that deep, but it is a wodnerful theatrical experience and full of potential for later analysis. Like the best of Brecht, the viewer is left in a state of conflict and ferment, ready to talk after the work of art is over. Sartre's work meets this standard, and is very close to first-rate literature.

Warmly recommended as a quintessential link in leftist, existential literature. It opened a world to me.
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on 11 May 1999
These four plays by Sartre are all very different in style if not tone, but they all cut to the bone of meaning in delivering their sobering messages. The best play is also the most famous, No Exit, filled with brilliant language and dramatic fire. The situations and questions posed within aspeak directly to our age. Next, The Respectful Prostitute, which shows how funny existentialists can be, and how gut-wrenching comedy can be both funny and chilling. The Flies is a wonderfully inventive play that one can picture just by reading, with its harsh words, though in the guise of classical language, never missing a stab at the characters--or the audience. The weakest play, Dirty Hands, is still a compelling but rather cliched drama which is a little too ponderous for theatre, but dead on with its analysis of the human condition. Overall, a very worthwhile collection and a great introduction to Sartre, and existentialism.
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on 8 April 1998
I picked this book up and read it, on a whim, and suddenly realized that I was entranced and couldn't put it down! I was hypnotized by No Exit (Huis Clos), and was thrilled and jarred by it. After I finished it, it really affected me. It is an unforgettable play! Each of the characters were so complex, and so real. The structure was infinitely ingenious, and infused with a brilliance that only Sartre could give. Usually, I don't like existentialism, but this is one play that no one should pass up. After I read it, I have been talking about it to all of my friends, raving and ranting, because it insuperable good. A great read, if you want to be transported to another world.
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on 2 January 2017
I was on the fence with this collection of plays. I did like No Exit, that was my favourite; I would have given that one 5 out of 5 for sure. I loved the depiction of hell, no physical torture, no flames, just being trapped in a room with two other disagreeable people for eternity, that would be torturous. The Flies was the next one I like but that would have been more a 4 out of 5, it dragged on in some parts but I liked the modern reworking of the Electra-Orestes story. I didn't like Dirty Hands, it felt too pretentious and The Respectable Prostitute made me uncomfortable with that language used and the ending pissed me off, both of those plays were 2 out of 5 for me which let the whole collection down. I can't say this collection made me want to read any more Sartre, I don't see the fuss myself but that's just my taste I guess.
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on 2 November 2010
4 very readable plays which can be enjoyed and understood by any English reader. However, you can tell that the book has been translated from French into English. Indeed there are some sentences which you will have to read twice in order to understand what the original French text actually meant because certain sentences are not written in a way that English people would say them. Nevertheless, this book is well worth the buy if you are interested in Sartre or merely looking for the plays to read in English.
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on 26 March 2006
The play "No Exit" is fantastic... a kind of psychological thriller about how people can get inside other people's heads and torment them through their weaknesses. A strange portrayal of hell that is truly hellish. However the translation from French to English is really poor. I believe it is "transliterated"; translated almost word for word, which overlooks the meaning or expression of certain phrases. For ex., "That's so, isn't it?", from the French," C'est ca, n'est pas?" Is that correct English? Shouldn't it be.. "Isn't it so?" or maybe, "Is that so"? Another ex., "We use to go"...", instead of we USED to go. It is "translated" like that all the way through the play. I found it very distracting, at best, and ultimately quite confusing. I found myself guessing at what Sartre was really trying to say.
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on 3 March 2016
Finally I read the play that quote came from.
The content here is not Sartre's best but it's good enough to justify the purchase.
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