Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Worried Blues Shop now Fitbit



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 18 July 2017
I loved this book. Beautifully written with a really interesting storyline. Perfect holiday reading.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 April 2017
Very good read Would love to see it made into a film.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 March 2017
Wonderful tale full of humanity
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 April 2017
Beautifully drawn characters and subtly layered
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 March 2013
This was the first Salley Vickers book I read, and I'm now a fan. The cleaner, Agnes, is something of a mystery - she's very capable and obliging, but is there some dark secret in her past? Certainly one or two of the residents of Chartres seem to think so, and they set out to establish her guilt. Salley Vickers has a knack for describing our all too human frailties as well as our redeeming qualities. This was a fascinating tale, and I'm so glad I discovered Salley Vickers by reading it. Highly recommended.
0Comment| 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 June 2013
This book was chosen for me by my book club. I had not previously read any of Salley Vickers' books and by the look of the cover I don't think I would have chosen it myself. How wrong I would have been as it is a lovely book written both in the present and past about an intriguing woman who works as a cleaner both in Chartres cathedral and in the homes of some of the local inhabitants. She has an air of mystery about her, but gradually her story unfolds. It's a very good book on several levels and I enjoyed it very much. Last week I attended a meeting where we met Salley and she told us more about her inspiration for the book and her method of story telling. She answered all the questions fully and I came away very impressed and determined to buy another of her books.
0Comment| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Redemption and self-discovery are recurrent themes in Salley Vickers' writing and she tackles the same subjects here in The Cleaner of Chartres. The central hub of the story is the ancient cathedral of Chartres which attracts a wide range of visitors, each one seeking something different to fulfil their incomplete lives. Agnes Morel is the enigmatic young woman at the centre of events, quietly engrossed in her task of cleaning but having a lasting effect on those who come in contact with her.

As the novel unfolds we gradually put together the pieces of Agnes' traumatic past, parts of which come back to haunt her. The supporting cast of locals are flawed, living, breathing individuals from the troubled, senile Abbe Bernard to the local gossiping widows Mmes Beck and Picot. Their stories intertwine with that of Agnes and we feel part of this small community.

This is a character-driven novel, exquisitely slow moving and beautifully written in a gentle, engaging style. It will probably also appeal to fans of the Chocolat series by Joanne Harris and the film Amelie.
0Comment| 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 April 2017
An easy enough read - passable holiday material. Agnes is an engaging personality and the tale rattles along reasonably well. But the Alain character - the guy restoring the cathedral (there's never any sign of anyone else but him doing this, which is daft) - is a pain. Even worse are the dreadful theological discussions he has with Agnes - skip them; you won't lose anything. There are some good characters - dippy Professor Jones, the awful Madame Beck and her buddy Madame Picot, and Mother Catherine - and the author has fun with them. These are the stuff of good storytelling - not high-flown theological debates that don't come off.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 October 2016
boring
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 March 2014
When I started reading thought this was set in post second world war France,then mobile phone and euros mentioned finished it as book group choice.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items

£6.99

Need customer service? Click here