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Customer reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
12
Black Ivory Second Edition: Slavery in the British Empire
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£22.49+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 3 February 2017
A very well written, entertaining but sad reflection on Britain's attitude concerning and participation in this most despicable of trades.
Hard to believe that Africans were in the same category as non human work animals, and how local African tribes used the trade as means to defeat/punish their enemies and enrich themselves in the process.

But was Dido Belle really 'a slave' as mentioned in the book? The accounts of her life on display at 'Kenwood House' in Hampstead Heath appear to suggest to the contrary?
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on 8 June 2011
This book was recommended by Philippa Gregory in her notes and references at the end of A Respectable Trade, which is a superb book in itself. I found it on Amazon in reasonable used condition and found it to be well researched and absorbing account of the Slave Trade and Slavery in the English colonies of the West Indies and the soon to be United States. It also covers some of the French, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese slave trade. I didn't know that Brazil had slavery until the 1870's, nor that Liverpool had over 100 sailing ships employed as slavers.

All aspects are covered including the farming of slaves in Africa, the horrendous journeys across the ocean, life in the plantations, rebellions and escapes by slaves, and slavery in England. The changing attitudes of the British towards slavery is well covered and the hypocrisy of God fearing wealthy people trading in humanity whilst practising Christianity. Muslim slavers in africa are memtioned too as are the hypocrites in the southern states of the USA which depended upon slave labour.

This is readable narrative history and prompts me to look for more books on the topic.
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on 24 August 2017
very good condition
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on 5 December 2013
This is a comprehensive and relatively easy to read book covering every aspect of the slave trade; a great reference for those doing A-level history.
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on 15 July 2015
Very informative and thorough. Really gives you insight and education.
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on 23 August 2015
For me - not bad but not good either. Probably my fault but it never kept me interested in the subject long enough to really merit the book as good. More than likely it just wasn't suitable for my tastes and others may find it far better.
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on 22 September 2014
A brilliant, brilliant book. I wanted to research and educate myself (as a white Englishman) on the history of black slavery within the context of the British Empire. I have to admit, the book is emotive for me, as I have a mixed-race family and so I felt it important to know about the subject matter; it binds a strong cord within our family histories.

Regards the book, I simply couldn't put it down; with every chapter, another door of discovery opened. The narrative is superb (even for a non-academic like myself) but you come away feeling so disgusted and angered by what occurred. You really do. By reading the book, Professor James Walvin doesn't soften the blow and you get a real illustration of the horrific practices that were committed in the name of 'trade'. What a filthy, disgusting blot on British history (and indeed other European nations) pushed down on Africans, that I don't think will ever be removed, or more importantly, forgotten and rightly so.
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on 4 September 2000
Using an academic (yet accessible) narrative, Walvin successfully educates the reader about the unspeakable horrors of British slavery. The physical and mental colinisation of the African slaves is brilliantly descirbed, as well as the barbaric conditions that made slavery one of history's most durable institutions. This book should be read by anyone who wishes to unravel the historical fabric of black/white race relations in the western world.
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on 16 November 2014
Acceptable interpretation from Walvin.
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on 20 August 2014
Item arrived promptly and as described
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