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on 9 August 2017
Interesting book good
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on 11 October 2017
Son loved it
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on 14 December 2017
Arrived promptly and exactly as described.
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on 16 April 2016
Great read!
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on 15 November 2017
Great book.
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on 10 October 2017
great book
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on 30 October 2015
An intriguing story written with varying styles that are appropriate to the shifting focus of the narrative.
BUT, as with many Amazon e-books, the quality of the printing is unacceptably poor.
Errors are numerous and, less than half way through the book, I've started to log them:
"car" instead of ear
"fed" instead of feel
"die" instead of the
"The" instead of . The
"I" instead of !

And I expect to be faced with more irritating mistakes that have to be unravelled in context.
NOT GOOD ENOUGH AND MUST DO BETTER!
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on 27 May 2017
A disturbing account of life in the Southern States of the USA during the late 1930's. Incredibly believable story. Each character is a believable person and may well have lived in the towns Carson McCullers lived in. Clearly describes the racial hate that existed (still exists?) and how police fostered it, as well as the difficulties people have in living their lives.
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VINE VOICEon 8 April 2017
A classic that I really enjoyed reading. Not the fast or easy read that we're used to being published today. It made a good change after a glut of rather silly psychological thrillers, like eating an apple after too much chocolate!
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on 18 September 2009
McCullers gets deep inside a dozen characters and turns them into living, breathing people full of hope and fear, love, unhappiness and hatred.

Lou runs a café and is a kind man with a deep interest in the people he serves; Jake is a self-proclaimed communist, in a cell of one because of his drinking and his inability to connect with ordinary people; Mady is a black doctor full of desire to bring his people to a better way of life, but his children bitterly disappoint him; Mick is a young girl, looking after her younger siblings, brighter than average and in love with music, but she is finding it hard to fight her way out of the expectations her family has for her.

The person who unites all of these is John Singer, a deaf mute, who listens to all that people have to say. There is a calm acceptance about this man, an other-worldly beneficence that people are touched by and by which they are given relief from the world that torments them. But Singer has a friend to whom he has given his heart - a huge, grotesque Greek man with a saintly and child-like disposition who is judged mentally disturbed and sent to live in an institution by his cousin, who fears he will be made responsible for him. This is not a sexual love on Singer's part, but is something plain and simple and completely fixed in his heart and mind.

The character of Singer is at the centre of each of the stories - his goodness, even saintliness, is manifest - yet he is deaf - he cannot hear what they say and the irony of his surname is perhaps intentional, since it seems that the peace he brings people is something ineffable, something people cannot resist - like, perhaps, a beautiful song?

The novel is full of incident and development, covering a year in the lives of these mill town people, many of whom are poverty-stricken and ignorant. The deep divisions between the races is shown unflinchingly, yet Singer walks at night in both the black and the white areas without molestation.

Their stories are fraught with tragedy and trouble, but there are remarkable moments of uplifting insight and beauty. In the end John Singer does not recognise the power he has to help and comfort others, but the novel ends on a note that promises hope for at least some of these people and their families.
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