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Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
7
4.3 out of 5 stars
A Brighter Sun (Longman Caribbean Writers)
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on 20 October 2003
Samuel Selvon, one of the three first writers of the Caribbean along with G. Lamming and V.S. Naipaul, caputures the attitudes in late 1930's Trinidad. While the rest of the world are dealing with Nazi Germany, the main issue at hand in Trinidad, for young East Indian, Tiger was coming to grips with what it is to be a man. In the first few chapters, Tiger in thrown into married life and providing for a family. It is the suddenness of these events and the naivety of a sixteen-year old Tiger that cause him to become dissatisfied with his lot in life. This dissatisfaction causes him to lose the one thing he wants the most. While tackling the progress of the main character Tiger, Selvon manages to intertwine issues of racial roles, gender roles and the effects of neocolonisation by the USA's military base in Trinidad. This book lends itself to the reader to discover the true life of the Caribbean; not just the one in travel brochures. It is also a great coming of age story which I myself read at age 15/16 as part of my secondary education. It is a book that will transcend generations. It is a classical Caribbean novel.
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on 7 January 2011
I've always loved this book - since I first read it for O'Levels.
It's Trinidad in the time of my grandparents and reflects a lot of the stereotypes and culture of that era which still trickle through today.

Samuel's description of Trindad as a country and an island is brilliant! It's just a sun and sand island but so much more which he captured wonderfully throughout this book.

I've given this book as a gift to a few British friends and they enjoyed it as well and found it easy to follow.
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on 28 July 2000
A the inception of the book selvon opens by describing the East Indian cultures in society. The continuing struggle a West Indian - East Indian has to face. The clash of cultures. An arranged marriage, no place to run. Tiger has to take care of his "new" family and in ther process struggle to at last "become a man". This causes him to drink and beat his wife. When the road development is coming to Deigo Matin Tiger now has to ensure thathecold be able to provide for the "family".
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on 13 August 2013
A well-written and engaging collection of short stories. Light and entertaining reading.
While I believe that persons who know (about) Trinidad/Trinidadians may appreciate this book a little more, it certainly is NOT a prerequisite.
Highly recommended.
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on 24 May 2014
It is an excellent novel I enjoyed the story. The purchase itself came on time and was in good condition. However it had markings throughout the book. For a used book though that was the only issue.
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on 14 October 2014
I first read the book from a library whilst on holiday in the caribbean and ordered the book so I could have a personal copy for myself.
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on 23 August 2006
The master-storyteller turns his pen to rural village life in Trinidad: gossip and rivalry between the village washerwoman; toiling cane-cutters reaping their meagre harvest; superstitious, old Ma Procop protecting the fruit of her mango tree with magic. With equal wit and sensitivity, he reflects the depression of `hard times' in London, where people live in cold, damp basements, hustling for survival.
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