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on 1 April 2017
Wonderful.
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on 21 August 2017
Classic
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on 23 August 2017
Great!!
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on 11 October 2014
A sci fi god, one of the best sci fi books ever written, and when they get round to it, its gonna be one of the best sci fi films ever.
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on 11 December 2017
So visionary... And the proof that we, humans, are but a speck of life in the Universe....
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on 13 June 2017
Very good book and despite second hand, very good quality.
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on 7 March 2017
I first came across this book via BBC Radio Four's programme 'Story Time' in November 1976 (or, as my wife says A Long Time Ago). It impressed the hell out of the ten year old me and, having ordered it from the local library, was impressed all over again. My dad was already a big sci-fi fan and, as a result of my evident enjoyment, began to feed me his Asimov and Clarke collection volume by volume.
Rama remains as fresh and enjoyable a book at nearly fifty-one as it was forty years ago. What I appreciate most now is the spare, uncluttered style of the author. Clarke is not big on wordy prose and his emphasis on concepts and story is often at the expense of detailed characterisation. In some ways this makes the book dated. If you are expecting detailed interpersonal subplots then you are likely to be disappointed.
Rama is on a hyperbolic path through the solar system, so Commander Norton and the crew of the Endeavour have a limited amount of time to explore the vast interior of the craft. What I liked about this was that there are no sudden shock revelations as to what Rama 'really' is. The explorers struggle to make sense of an inexplicable alien environment and what they do discover comes via good old fashioned scientific investigation and reasoned deduction.
This is classic 'hard' science fiction, emotionally understated by todays standards perhaps, but no less powerful for that.
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on 23 October 2017
I liked this book, but I didn't love it. It tells a great story with what could have been, some great dramatic moments, only they weren't. I felt this book really lacked some enthusiasm and emotion. Everything seemed to be described in a one pace, monotone type voice, at least for me. I could really build up much empathy for the characters, the world of Rama or much else in the book. That's not to say that I didn't like it, some of the ideas and images from the book were amazing. I just feel like it needed a bit of a kick up the bum and someone to breathe a little soul into the book.

If you like exploration books, this is a good one. If you love a little drama and suspense to your books, this may leave you a little wanting.
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VINE VOICEon 14 July 2016
Until two months ago, I had read only one Arthur C Clarke novel, 2001: A Space Odyssey, as a school boy some 35 years ago. I have now read The City and Stars, which was excellent; and now this novel, which won all sorts of awards back in the 1970s, which was almost as good. A mysterious object enters the solar system like a comet on a long approach, but it turns out to be artificial. A mission lands on it and explores the mysteries of this giant hollow cylinder. Clarke's imagination and extrapolation of scientific principles are breathtaking and this is a great read. I might say I was slightly frustrated by the lack of explanations at the end, but in an SF novel this powerful, that doesn't really matter. I am aware that there are several sequels to this, but that they are generally poorly regarded.
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on 14 November 2017
I approached this as a bit of nostalgia, re-visiting my youth when Clarke, Asimov, EE Doc Smith and company fed a young imagination and literally fuelled many of my dreams. Of course it does sound a little dated, this was written in the 70s so that's inevitable. I couldn't help but smile as the spaceship captain asked "who is on the switchboard?".

However, I think this one stands the test of time rather better than a lot of classic sci-fi. Mostly, the age of the story is not intrusive but the excellent inventiveness and masterful story-telling both come to the fore. It's still a very enjoyable tale and unlike many I liked the way that it ended leaving things so open. That actually led to a full and much lengthier series but it was originally designed to be a stand-alone novel. I think you can take it either way but for those that like things tied up neatly at the end will be embarking on a series not just one book.

The narration by Toby Longworth is decent, his character voices are good but in the narrative text he can sound a little languid compared to some other narrators.

So, whether you like a good story or fancy re-visiting an old sci-fi classic this relatively short burst of Arthur C Clarke is well worth considering.
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