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4.5 out of 5 stars
162
4.5 out of 5 stars
QI: The Second Book of General Ignorance: The Discreetly Plumper Edition
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£8.28+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 30 November 2010
This new offering is another piece of wry loveliness from the guys at QI (whose lunchtime chat is a fearsome thing to imagine). It's teeming with lots of genuinely interesting snippets, some of the more disgusting - I'll be honest - I wish I hadn't read, and some of which still make me giggle days after I've read them.

What it manages really well - surprisingly so in a book that's essentially, well, about facts - is to maintain a rip-rattling pace, even while shifting topic with such frequency. It's very easy, for example, to get sucked into a bit about, say, how elephants get drunk, and not emerge until you've been firmly put in your place about the effect cracking your knuckles really has (if you're thinking arthritis you're - surprise surprise - wrong). For me, it also achieves the rare feat of making scientific stuff interesting ... if only my biology teacher at school had used this as a textbook.

The writing is superb, striking a note somewhere between authoritative and gently mocking. One of my favourite bits is from the article on absinthe:

"The active ingredient in wormwood is thujone .... [it] can be dangerous in high doses and does have a mild psychoactive effect, but not at the 10 milligrams per litre concentration that most absinthe contains. Sage, tarragon and Vicks VapoRub all contain similar levels of thujone, but no one has yet linked them to depraved behaviour."

Brilliant. If that raised a giggle - even a slight one - you'll love this book.
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on 15 August 2017
A must for the trivia fan or a anyone whose day is incomplete with out acquiring some additional piece of arcane knowledge.
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on 10 October 2017
This was a birthday present for my son and he liked it.
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on 10 August 2017
nice fun book to pick up occasionally
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on 3 May 2017
another fun book from Qi
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on 29 August 2016
Found it all a bit boring TBH.
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on 21 September 2017
fascinating
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on 29 December 2012
Plenty of fascinating material here, and as entertainingly written as the first. However it suffers from lacking punch due to most of the big Klaxon-bait questions having already been used, and so there are far fewer moments of taken-for-granted knowledge being shockingly swept away.
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on 9 February 2016
Good*****
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on 22 March 2014
Great content and excellent read, or browse . You will be amazed at how many ideas are historically incorrect !!
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