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on 23 May 2009
this is a very useful guide to Shakespeare's plays; telling you the plot and the caracters and how they interact. I went to see The Tempest recently and it was a play i didnt know at all, and this guide was very usefull.
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on 11 May 2009
Really useful for a quick/introductory guide to the plays. Makes a good point to start from if you want to know more about the plays, or to understand them a bit better.
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on 15 April 2014
Ho now! If thou hath studied Shakespeare then thou dost know that the sub-text of EVERY Shakespeare play carries two messages – these being a): that the church and absolute monarchs do NOT have magic powers; and b): that intervention to rid the world of despots and treachery is impossible because in attempting to do so, a despotic regime that is far worse will take its place.

If thou thinks that thee knows thy Shakespeare and thou doth not possess this splendiferous manuscript – then think again!

Lo - what rests within the folds of this majestic manuscript dear sweet serenity? As we begin to get to know each other, pray permit me to maketh an attempt to surreptitiously inform thee, and in so doing - to enlighten thee and arouse thy curiosity.

Should thou perchance to indulge in the clandestine contents of this masterful publication, then thee dear bookworm will go on a journey of enlightenment like no other.

Methinks that thou will be so amazed and enthralled by the astonishing text scribeth upon each wonderful page of enlightenment, that thou will step back in wonderment and awe at the magnificence of Shakespeare’s noble and majestic writings – writings that demanded bravery and fortitude, written in a time of extreme danger to an ever-threatened monarchy whose overthrow would have brought dire and disastrous consequences to Britain and all that we stand for.

Within the ramparts of this splendiferous publication doth lie hidden a wonderment of beautiful treasures that go far beyond the tensioned coils of the mainspring of the tales made known upon the pages – for here we have a true masterwork that deeply delves into the sublime recesses of the Bards plays to discover the TRUE role of the characters; the vengeful purpose that they doth play (What - even Puck? I heareth you exclaim - and - yes - even Puck); the allegories, sub-texts, and sub-plots that each play doth surreptitiously contain; supplemented with the meaning of the play and its role in its historical context – and how Shakespeare did constructeth his plays to bring forth enlightenment and wisdom to Queen Elizabeth – the Virgin Queen that drove away the Spanish Armada from these green and sceptred isles – and in so doing - changed Britain and her fortunes forever.

Study the entry on Romeo and Juliet and you will discover Friar Laurence, ‘The grey-eyed morning smiles on the frowning night’ tells us that Friar Laurence is a person who is most in touch with the NATURAL world. But who IS Friar Laurence? What is his purpose? What maketh Friar Laurence so shifty and so dangerous? And why did Shakespeare stripeth Friar Laurence – a man of the cloth - of any morality – as is revealed in the last act of the play? If thou readeth the paragraph at the bottom of page 186 and the conclusion at the top of page 187, thou shalt discover the answers.

Whether it is nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous publications, or to take arms against a sea of ignorance – and in so doing – end them – is up to you.
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on 19 March 2013
I found this useful to get me up to speed with various shakespeare plays that I didn't have time to read. I am studying Drama at university and am dyslexic and found this very useful.
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on 28 July 2013
The Faber Guide to Shakespeare is extremely comprehensive and useful to refer to when watching plays [to check cast list, etc.] Also useful for quizzes and crossword puzzles.
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on 13 January 2014
at last can get my head around his many works in a manner that simplifys often quite complicated plots. A good entry into the bard's works.
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on 31 January 2014
Was a present for my nephew and was greatly appreciated. He's just qualified as a teacher and goes well in his collection.
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on 7 October 2014
Bought for a friend. It was just what she wanted.
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on 9 August 2014
Very good
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on 5 November 2012
This is fine. Pop down to Stratford to see a play two or three times a year and like to brush up on the plot before I do so.
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