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on 3 August 2011
Just read "The Last Train to Scarborough" on holiday - and thoroughly enjoyed it - five stars as usual for a Jim Stringer detective novel.
I do see there's a wide disparity of reviews for this book - it seems it's a "Marmite" novel - people either love it or hate it (and I think that would apply to the other books in the series).The thing is I can see why - Andrew Martin's style is highly idiosyncratic and personal. Much of what the characters say seems irrelevant and almost deliberately confusing. There is heavy reliance throughout on regular italics for emphasis - except why particular words are emphasised in this way is often as big a mystery as the plot itself.
The general "feel" of the narrative is almost dream like - almost nightmarish at times. It's as if the whole proceedings are enveloped in a dense Edwardian fog so you have to concentrate hard as what is going on and why. Andrew Martin's main asset is his uncanny ability to summon up a long gone era - how does he do it? It's as if you have gone back in a time machine and you are actually there. I read Sebastian Faulks' "Birdsong" some years ago and he has the same ability to transport the reader back in time - it's almost hypnotic and it's very effective. Up to a point plot in Jim Stringer novels is secondary to atmosphere so just enjoy it as you go along - although here the plot is (eventually) understandable which isn't always the case with other novels in the series.
So - if you fancy an atmospheric unusual well written detective story - just read this. You'll love it or hate it......
6 people found this helpful
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on 7 October 2017
I could not re a lily g eat along with the plot
jumping. Around ,it deemed disjointed and did not flow
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on 2 March 2018
Bought as a gift for a family member who seemed to love it.
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on 21 December 2013
I have now read all the Jim Stringer series and every one' a corker, this one is no different. Nice period touches, my only criticism is that Ibwould have likes a bit more railway content actually aboard the iron horses!
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on 31 January 2015
Along with Edward Marston, Andrew Martin has written another excellent detective series. In both cases, read one and you'll want to collect them all.
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on 9 December 2017
not quite what I was expecting
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on 20 July 2014
Once again Andrew Martin takes us back to a different age of train travel. His obvious pleasure & research, has you walking beside
Jim Stringer, you can practically smell the smoke & steam
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on 8 October 2015
A rattling good read for the railway enthusiast and those that like a good whodunnit!
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on 3 December 2017
Nice item.
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on 10 March 2013
Another historical fictional murder/mystery novel set around the steam railway age and the beautiful seaside resort of Scarborough. Thoroughly enjoyable with many a twist and turn before the murders are resolved.
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