Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Learn more Shop now Learn more

Customer reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
15


on 19 January 2016
this book stands the test of time, as relevant and readable as it ever was, it is a classic.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 February 2016
Great story
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 10 January 2014
Used to watch Benedict on the telly. Loved him because he is always so miserable. Husband and I found this very funny.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 10 October 2014
good to deal with
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 December 2000
In this book Benidict tells of his journey to the mouth of the Amazon. It is an exellent account concentrating on the people and land in detail rarely expressed with such passion and understanding.
Benidict learns to live in harmony with his surroundings by following the local peoples examples, his desire to learn and to complete his journey is an inspiration. There is never a dull moment or a detail lost.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 27 October 2002
'Mad White Giant' is Benedict Allen's tale of his one-man expedition from the mouth of the Orinoco river across the Amazon basin to the place where the sun rises. It is an enthralling journey, a learning curve at every step for the author, who by his own admission is a changed man by the time he re-emerges from the jungle among the cut branches of a cassava field at Macapa, near the mouth of the Amazon. The book is insightful in its innocence as 'Louco Benedito' simply records what he observes and undergoes along the way without the soapbox commentary that so often mars the writings of others - it is, as he says, merely the experience of "a young white man launching out into an exotic world which he didn't, and couldn't, understand." And this is its attraction and joy, the portrayal of a world in the bold colours of youth that allows the reader to draw his own opinion on matters without too much in the way of authorial didacticism. The reader's journey is as thoroughly invigorating as the young explorer's. Our initial excitement at Allen's great expedition, fuelled by such wonderful encounters with characters like Zorola, Tautau and Yepe, is soured by the same fruits that he himself is forced to taste, namely the exploitations and temptations of modernity and the western world that pervade the Amazonian gloom and corrupt the purity of the indigenous Indian tribes and their cultures. He tells us, as he dozes in a hammock at the end of his journey, that in the jungle, "I...left part of myself behind." This is overwhelmingly true. The bright eyes through which we look at the beginning of the book become glazed with a weary wisdom, even if he doesn't explicate it himself, and we as readers are privy to the lessons that he has learnt the hard way.
'Mad White Giant' is at one level a brilliant account of a man daring to live out his dream, whilst at the same time is a record of the strife, conflict and corruption that inevitably arise when first-world meets third-world, a loss of innocence not only for the author but also for many of those he meets. In every way it is a worthwhile read.
0Comment| 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 27 October 2002
'Mad White Giant' is Benedict Allen's tale of his one-man expedition from the mouth of the Orinoco river across the Amazon basin to the place where the sun rises. It is an enthralling journey, a learning curve at every step for the author, who by his own admission is a changed man by the time he re-emerges from the jungle among the cut branches of a cassava field at Macapa, near the mouth of the Amazon. The book is insightful in its innocence as 'Louco Benedito' simply records what he observes and undergoes along the way without the soapbox commentary that so often mars the writings of others - it is, as he says, merely the experience of "a young white man launching out into an exotic world which he didn't, and couldn't, understand." And this is its attraction and joy, the portrayal of a world in the bold colours of youth that allows the reader to draw his own opinion on matters without too much in the way of authorial didacticism. The reader's journey is as thoroughly invigorating as the young explorer's. Our initial excitement at Allen's great expedition, fuelled by such wonderful encounters with characters like Zorola, Tautau and Yepe, is soured by the same fruits that he himself is forced to taste, namely the exploitations and temptations of modernity and the western world that pervade the Amazonian gloom and corrupt the purity of the indigenous Indian tribes and their cultures. He tells us, as he dozes in a hammock at the end of his journey, that in the jungle, "I...left part of myself behind." This is overwhelmingly true. The bright eyes through which we look at the beginning of the book become glazed with a weary wisdom, even if he doesn't explicate it himself, and we as readers are privy to the lessons that he has learnt the hard way.
'Mad White Giant' is at one level a brilliant account of a man daring to live out his dream, whilst at the same time is a record of the strife, conflict and corruption that inevitably arise when first-world meets third-world, a loss of innocence not only for the author but also for many of those he meets. In every way it is a worthwhile read.
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 8 May 2002
A unique account of modern-day exploration into the heart of the Amazonian jungle which really will have you at the edge of your seat. I was - from start to finish - unable to put it down. From the off-set you feel like you are right there with Allen as he makes his way on this physically, emotionally and spiritually demanding journey - but at times you will most certainly be glad that you are not.
His journey is not only about the alien landscape of the Amazon and how he survives it but his encounters with new people and the friendships he forges. These people are, without doubt different from ‘us’ but you will soon discover that the common thread that binds us all is as simple as our humanity. Allen comes across the most unusual of situations and the rapid twists and turns of the journey will leave you gasping for breath. This book will give you an appetite for more - it is definitely a must read for all armchair explorers!
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 19 July 2004
As well as being a compulsive, thrilling read this book deals with issues of indigenous peoples and the destruction of ancient cultures by the western civilisation. I finished it last week and am now sitting at my computer screen in London I am still thinking about the tribes of the Amazon jungle.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 1 February 2012
I'm not a big reader - but this is one book I stumbled across that I couldn't put down. I'd seen "Ice Dogs" on TV - his journey across Arctic Circle and looked him up to see if he'd written any books. This books was fascinating and really enthralling - even deeply sad at one point (which I won't spoil). I can't believe he doesn't get more exposure than the odd tv moment...
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)