Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
1
4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

#1 HALL OF FAMEon 10 April 2002
'My Time With Antonioni' is a diary-essay recording Wim Wenders co-direction of 'Beyond the Clouds' with a post-illness Michaelangelo Antonioni- director of such greats as 'L'Aventura','Blow Up' & 'Zabriskie Point' (the latter's denoument excuses the preceding mess). Wenders had just wrapped up his minor-masterpiece 'The Lisbon Story' & was between post-production & something else when the option of aiding a debilitated auteur came up. The ensueing pages have put me off ever going into the world of film- there is that sense evoked in Wender's 'On Film' that populist-marketing has taken over cinema-chain cinemas & 'Star Wars' are killing 'films' (how did 'Until the end of the world' get produced?). Ironic 'City of Angels' has probably played to a wider audience than 'Wings of Desire'. So, there is the problematic realm of the arthouse movie- now being marketed towards the elite (have you seen the prices of carrot cake and/or arthouse videos?). The second nightmare is Antonioni- who speaks a different language to Wenders in more ways than one. Plus I feel he is over-rated compared to Bergman, Godard or Visconti (to name but a few). The production is as frustrating to read as it must have been for Wenders- lots of mind games...So, this is a rather interesting book for those who did either of the auteurs and who liked 'Beyond the Clouds'. Which I thought was mostly terrible- the vast on-screen nudity was very sad old man rather than erotic & John Malkovich was his usual irritating self. 'Night on Earth' does this thing much better! ...I don't think this book is on the same level as Lillian Ross's seminal 'Film'- but it is a great insight into the life of an auteur & a good companion to the collection of Wenders writings 'On Film'.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Need customer service? Click here