Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's



on 20 January 2013
I first became aware of the Zen police stories through the 3 part televison series and wanted to see what the original stories were like.
"Ratking" is the first in the collection and whilst there are similarities, the books (as usaul) provide a far more rounded and in depth analysis of the main charcters and the story in general.
I will admit to picturing Rufus Sewell as Aurelio Zen whilst reading, but this didn't spoil the story, if anything, his slightly hang-dog, world weary stoicism helped me picture the worlld he was inhabiting.
I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know more about Zen and the machinations of Italian politics and how it affects the policeman's daily lot.
Off to buy the next in the series.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 August 2017
I found the book Ratking very different from the TV series and most interesting. It was slightly slow in the build up but just as fascinating as the TV episode of the same name. The storyline differences altered the whole thing and was slightly less funny than TV but the character of Zen was more sympathetic and thoughtful and gave an interesting insight into the main character's behaviour A good read..
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 May 2013
I enjoyed the tv series, but this is the first of the books I have read. It didn't disappoint, but as other posters have said, the Zen in the books is quite different from Rufus Sewell's portrayal. There are two mysteries in this book : what happened to the kidnapped industrialist, but also, why Zen was marooned in a desk job. Both are explained by the end, but Dibden avoids most of the cliches of crime writing. There is virtually no action, nor any daring plot twists. As for Zen himself, he is not the usual renegade cop, he is simply a good detective working in a deeply flawed system. He tries to operate without making enemies, but of course, it's impossible, and even he has to resort to Machiavellian tactics to solve the case.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 August 2017
I love Aurelio Zen and along with others absolutely loathe tv for dropping the series with Rufus Sewell. This book is superb
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 April 2017
Another good book
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 September 2017
A friend recently recommended the Zen books to me and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Dibdin's scene setting descriptions are brilliant and his hero Zen is very likeable. I'm ordering #2 in the series today.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 August 2017
It took me a while to get into this book, having chosen it after enjoying the Zen tv series. The last few chapters, however, really had me engrossed and I am glad I stuck with it.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 June 2013
I loved the character of Zen and the way the plot played out made for a most enjoyable read. I will most happily read more of the Zen novels as I feel so attached to this Italian policeman.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 April 2017
Essential reading!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 July 2017
Dibdin is a terrific writer
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


Need customer service? Click here