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on 11 May 2017
I found the other books in series in a car boot sale. Then noticed this one wasn't there. I thought I wait to read until I found it. A number of visits no sign of it. I gave up and got on Kindle. Yes, you guess it I found it later that day . It was only a few pence but it was just typical. Now for the book itself . I found an exciting easy quick read. A good fun romp. One thing I did notice the paper has Ed Gorman has co author but Kindle edition makes no mention even the copyright .
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on 19 February 2014
In ‘City of Night’ we return once more to the world of Dr Victor Frankenstein and his monster 200 years after the famous Mary Shelley novel. Victor now goes by the name of Helios and is unaware that his monster (now known as Deucalion) is still out there and set on revenge. Dr F is too busy trying to create a New Race that is slowly replacing humans with super powerful beings that he controls. Should work out quite well for the crazy scientist; except that a lot of creations are rather glitchy.

‘City’ is a daft pulp novel that at times takes itself a little too seriously, this is a Dead Koontz joint after all (with the aid of Ed Gorman). For all the purple prose and mood setting, it is really a daft science fiction novel about a scientist using powerful clones to take over the world – any link to the original story is pretty redundant. The action is well written, some great scenes involving a killer couple on the lookout for some cops to kill and any scene with Deucalion using his full strength. However, this is part 2 in a series and feels like it, there is no conclusion at all and everything is left open for book 3.

What makes the book enjoyable is the chaos that surrounds Helios. He is a particular man and seeing his creations fumble around is great fun. His perfect world starts to crumble, not through the revenge of his first monster, or the antics of two cops. Instead, it is all down to bad science. Koontz and Gorman follow several of Frankenstein’s creations as their coding begins to fail; it is these elements that prove the most interesting thing in the book. Odd that the side characters should prove to be the best element, but hopefully the main characters will come to the fore in book 3.
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on 19 February 2014
In ‘City of Night’ we return once more to the world of Dr Victor Frankenstein and his monster 200 years after the famous Mary Shelley novel. Victor now goes by the name of Helios and is unaware that his monster (now known as Deucalion) is still out there and set on revenge. Dr F is too busy trying to create a New Race that is slowly replacing humans with super powerful beings that he controls. Should work out quite well for the crazy scientist; except that a lot of creations are rather glitchy.

‘City’ is a daft pulp novel that at times takes itself a little too seriously, this is a Dead Koontz joint after all (with the aid of Ed Gorman). For all the purple prose and mood setting, it is really a daft science fiction novel about a scientist using powerful clones to take over the world – any link to the original story is pretty redundant. The action is well written, some great scenes involving a killer couple on the lookout for some cops to kill and any scene with Deucalion using his full strength. However, this is part 2 in a series and feels like it, there is no conclusion at all and everything is left open for book 3.

What makes the book enjoyable is the chaos that surrounds Helios. He is a particular man and seeing his creations fumble around is great fun. His perfect world starts to crumble, not through the revenge of his first monster, or the antics of two cops. Instead, it is all down to bad science. Koontz and Gorman follow several of Frankenstein’s creations as their coding begins to fail; it is these elements that prove the most interesting thing in the book. Odd that the side characters should prove to be the best element, but hopefully the main characters will come to the fore in book 3.
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on 27 March 2007
Well when I thought it couldnt get any better Koontz shocked me once again. Having devoured Book 1 I couldnt wait for Book 2 to come out. Never in a million years did I expect to stay rivetted on the edge of my seat and unable to put the book down again. All I can say is I cannot wait for Book 3 and when thats finished I will be very disappointed that there isnt more to come.
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on 1 June 2007
I have re read the two existing books in preparation for the release of Book 3, just to be frustrated by the delay in publication, so I may even read them again. One thing that hasn't been mentioned so far is that although Dean Koontz has the main authorship for the trilogy they are co written in the style of "Koontz" by Ed Gorman. Patterson also does this with his "Women's Club" books. In this case it isn't a problem as the books are great, they do "throw back" to more early Koontz style than some of his more current books with a "recipe" namely the "ODD" books ( A "Good Guy" in a dilemma), The Husband, and of course The GOOD GUY, I wonder where he got that title? The Frankenstein Books are a great unique read. Dont miss. The others are OK but very formulaic.
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on 27 February 2011
Koontz does not often write series of novels. Odd Thomas is his only exception, tho he has written at least one other character that has recurred (Christopher Snow) after about 100 books. But with Frankenstein two, City of the Dead, you sense he's conceived all these books (fifth one written and due out soon as I write) in the bathtub together. Because, the man is still flying high with the storyline and prose from the first novel and my feeling is, he just had to decide where to bring the guillotine down on where to divide them.

OK, time to be brutal, good as this is, with continuity and tone all preserved beautifully, it is not as good as the first book. That may be the fate of "episodic" writing, this definitely feels like series two of the TV series, with some characters returning (some didn't live to make it this far from book one) and a few new ones who also have to battle to make book three - and boy, does Koontz set that up well. But its a slower burn than book one, though the simmer is first class.

Real progression here, and you do warm to all the key characters, and I like Koontz's intelligence re-imagining and updating of the Frankenstein story. As fiction goes, its a clever and adroit adapting of the story into modern settings and times, with the relevant scientific context and yet the same disturbing questions being asked in a fresh way. The only weakness, narritively, is that don't know Victor himself as well as I feel we should. That, however, is not the sort of oversight a novelist as accomplished as Dean Koontz will overlook for long. No doubt books three and four will have corrected it.

Highly recommended, but definitely read them in sequence or you'll ruin all the surprises!
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on 12 March 2006
Dean Koontz has to be one of my favourite authors and this book does not disappoint. I have read both parts of this story and cannot wait until the third is released later this year.
A great twist on this classic story and once i picked this book up did not want to put it down (a lot of late nights) fast paced, definatley never a dull moment and great characters. A very well written and absorbing book.
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on 8 July 2006
Whilst I agree, the story just leaves you waiting impatiently for the 3rd book, the story is so well written. It had me sup late many nights. I think Dean Koontz is a genius and what a wonderful marketing ploy. I bet half of America will go buy the third book as soon as it hits the shelves. Why would you blame someone for wanting to make a little extra money? Love the book, love the author, can't wait to get the third and the end of the story.
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on 20 October 2005
I've been a Dean Koontz fan since 1989 (when I first read Watchers) and I've read 30+ of his novels so far. Most of his "earlier" books - meaning the first 20 years are absolutely terrifying, gripping pageturners - Intensity kept me awake a full night.
A few years ago I noticed a change of style in his novels as they became lighter and a little bit less exciting, also the female heroes suddenly became very feisty and snappy while the males were more wimpy and lummox-like (Ticktock, By the light of the moon etc.) which I found a little bit off-putting (although, if you can see beyond that, both of these novels are still somewhat enjoyable).
FRANKENSTEIN - THE PRODIGAL SON and FRANKENSTEIN - CITY OF NIGHT bring back the "old" Dean Koontz who, with this series, once again concentrates more on the killings, the killers and the gripping fear of the readers rather than dwelling on complex modern male-female relationships. With this series, we get four leading characters: Victor Helios/Frankenstein, Deucalion, who is his first creation, and the two detectives Carson O'Conner and Michael Maddison. In addition to them, there are numerous other characters portrayed in the novels, like Victor's "creations", the New People. Koontz manages to describe everybody's intentions without giving away too much. I can't wait for the third and final book to come out.
If you love gripping suspense thrillers, look no further. After reading those Frankenstein novels, my faith in Dean Koontz is once again fully restored.
Another brilliant Koontz novel I'd like to recommend is "The face of fear" - both the book and surprisingly, the movie are fantastic and shouldn't be missed by any Dean Koontz fan.
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on 28 March 2006
Ok so let me start by saying I enjoyed this book, it continues directly from the last book, more varied characters are introduced and some plots in the first book are finished in this book. I have a few problems with it. Firstly, why didnt they make just one big book? Money I assume is the answer to that. You get the feeling when you come to the end of this book that they cut the full length book of this trilogy into three with scissors randomly, as book 2 does not really leave you shouting what happened next, but obviously you will buy the third book just to conclude the story. Another irregularity is the character victor helios, I got the feeling in this book he was a more watered down version of victor from book one, he actually has a sense of humour and his tolerance is much more in this book. overall its a great story but as I say why not just one big book?
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