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Customer reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
14
3.9 out of 5 stars


VINE VOICEon 14 May 2017
The Indy spin-off novel series comes to a sombre end with this final instalment. It feels a bit disjointed but it most certainly the fastest moving of the series so it's not much of a problem. Kicking off in China, Indy is pursued by an overzealous Japanese soldier who fully intends to torture him for information. After being saved by a gypsy mother/daughter duo he treks with them to find their missing patriarch and a mysterious tome known as The Omega Book across shipwrecks, deserts, and leper islands.

Yes, it's a bit incoherent, and often it feels padded, which is crazy since the novel clocks in at well under 200 pages. However, I was never bored by it and I like the callbacks to the previous novels, and foreshadowing of Temple of Doom (which, chronologically, takes place the next year). I think Max McCoy realised he wrapped up the main story a little too quickly and felt the need to extend the ending by giving his earlier novels a more definitive conclusion. McCoy has hinted at Bantam giving him difficulty with this novel so it is possible that they have edited much of the coherence out.

It could have been the best Indy novel with a more fleshed-out story, but I'm happy with it as a solid 3/5.
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on 25 May 1999
While I must say that Max McCoy is my favorite of the Indiana Jones authors, and I'm sorry that this is his last book, Secret of the Sphinx had a couple of odd moments in it. There are veiled references to Indy looking older than he should and cryptic comments about past events that we don't seem to be privy to. Most disapointing is the total lack of explanation as to why they went to Egypt... a vital bit, considering the title. I've heard McCoy had "creative differences" with Bantam on this book... something to do with time travel. It makes me wonder if they've clipped passages from the book.
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on 9 August 1999
The book had a great beginning, and I like the tie-in to Dinosaur Eggs, with the dagger. After that, the book slows a bit, then picks up when they begin searching for the staff of Aaron, which is one of my favorite artifacts in the books(the alicorn included). The Omega book is a very interesting find, but one is disapointed when (yet again) Indy and co. leave without the artifact that they have been searching for. This has happened HOW many times now?! I mean, the golden scroll, Noah's Ark, the Alicorn, the philosopher's stone, the holy grail, the list goes on and on. It's getting depressing. Sorry, I seem to have strayed a bit. To finish, McCoy is my favorite auther and it saddens me that this is his final book. Why couldn't he write six, like MacGreggor?!
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on 21 January 2005
I couldn't help but see Harrison Ford every time I imagined Indy in a certain situation. McCoy has brought Indy's character to life. Dr. Jones's wit and quick-thinking ability are still the same, but I found the ending a little hard to grasp. That said, it kept me hooked and entertained for a good few hours.
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on 19 September 2009
'Indiana Jones and the Secret of the Sphinx' is, like most of the other original Indy novels, a lot of fun. There's a pulpy quality to the story, and a relentless pace, which helps it recapture the spirit of the films perfectly, and although the macguffin in this story - a book with mystical powers supposedly containing the life story of everyone who ever lived - isn't the strongest, there's a lot to enjoy here. Anyone chomping at the bit for more Indiana Jones films could do a lot worse than give one of these books a go.
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on 8 July 1999
I was mildly intrigued by the concept, but it was under developed, as was every locale and the point of being there. I was disturbed by the fact on page 71 Indy replies to questions from Faye by telling her that he had never been married, when in fact he met and married Deidre Campbell before she died. This all occured in the first six novels by Rob MacGregor, which by the way is by far the best of the IJ writers.
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on 5 October 2016
Very enjoyable Indiana Jones book. Captured the feel of the films and I Could almost hear the soundtrack of John Williams at certain scenes described by the author.
Found this book in our holiday hotel lobby and from reading the reviews it seams people regard this as one of the best. Shame as I was left wanting more.
Have ordered a couple of others to see.
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on 13 July 1999
This book was a really good read. The book contained alot of action and showed why Indiana Jones is one of the greatest action heros. Max McCoy did a fantastic job at describing Indy's ideas and feelings in this book. This book was also very good because it was set in so many different places. Over all, The Secret of The Sphinx is a really good book.
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on 22 July 1999
I've read all of the books by Max McCoy and I must say that they've all been worth about three stars each. This doesn't say very much when all of Rob macGregor's books were worth five stars each. I just thank God that Martin Caidin didn't last. What happened to Rob? We want him back!!!!!!!
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on 22 May 1999
Of all the authors to have written the Indiana Jones novels, Max McCoy has best captured the magic of the Lucas-Speilberg-Ford character. Unlike Macgregor's new age religion bent, McCoy captures a mixture of James Randi cynicism and child like wonder.
Fun summer reading.;)
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