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Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
10
Magical Child
Format: Mass Market Paperback|Change


on 24 December 2012
This book should be given to every one in the World! It would change the World in one generation! It is very disturbing and very beautiful at the same time! If only people would wake up and stop reading rubbish! Stop watching TV, stop believing the Media, this book is one of the greatest indeed,I highly recommend it to all, for those who fall pregnant without it? then I pity you indeed!
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on 11 August 2013
What a book! Certainly gives you plenty to think about. Every parent to be should read it. In fact any person involved with young children would find it very interesting and thought provoking.
Every child is magical but their parents need to be tuned into this magic or the child and ultimately society suffer.
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on 21 February 2018
A very important book , it has helped me raise my kids with much more understanding, no home should be without a copy.
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on 12 January 2015
Great book. Thanks :-)
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on 7 November 2016
good read
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on 19 September 2014
cool
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on 17 April 2014
We can all be grateful to Joseph Chilton Pearce for writing and publishing a text that will stimulate more 'Aha' moments for prospective parents/ grandparents (i.e. near as makes no difference the whole population) than (probably) any other on the topic of child birth and the early stages of child development.

The integrity of the information is enhanced by the authors understanding of the greater whole, with the nature of the life-force that surrounds (and would support) us.

So many sections are overflowing the spine-tingling flashes of truth that the veracity in what is revealed (only what we already innately know) would only be stubbornly shunned by a thoroughly beaten up institutionalised mentality (something no one ought to aspire to).

Written in 1977 (!) and transformationally refreshing Today.
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on 15 December 2012
Certainly worth a read, but it can become excessively complicated because of the way it is written which made it a struggle to finish. I think the author could have conveyed his message in half the book size with more potency. Still a good read and worth considering other perspectives.
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on 11 August 2002
This is the first book I have read recently which has made me want to go out immediately and start recommending it to everyone I meet who is concerned with the emotional and spiritual development, as well as the education and intelligence, of children. It explains, in great detail, Nature's evolutionary plan for our brain's development from reptillian to highly evolved "new brain", including the ways in which children learn to process the information they recieve from their exploration of their environment. It goes on to explain the dangers of going against nature where children's needs are concerned, and the dangers - very real - of expecting children to learn things which they cannot possibly be expected to understand. Even things like reading and writing are abstract concepts, the author argues, which prematurely force a "separation" between the two halves of the brain. Children,in short, should be left to develop at their own pace, and should be allowed to explore their world without interference from "well-meaning" adults who attempt to stop them using all 5 senses to make sense of their world. For example, very young children need to taste, touch, smell etc a stick in order to process all the information about that stick and "file it away" in their brain so that any later encounters with a stick can be compared fully. This is true for everything a child encounters. A parent may attempt to impose their own opinions about said stick, by snatching it away because it is "dirty" etc., and this can have a negative effect on the way a child learns to learn. There is also a lot of very essential information about the needs of infants, from babyhood onwards, and why it is crucial that these needs are met. For example, he compares a typical western style of raising a baby, where the child may be abandoned for long periods and fed according to the parents' schedule, with a natural style, now known as attachment parenting, in which a baby's need are met on cue, and the child is in 24 hour contact with another human being, as in many tribal cultures round the world.
If you are at all concerned with child development, whether as a parent or professional, or if you are interested in learning about attachment parenting, then this book is essential reading and should be then recommended to others! It may also be of interest to those parents wishing to educate their children outside the school system, as this book is surely one of the best arguments for home education, even though it does not specifically mention it. If you are wondering which "method" of home education to use, then this book might very well provide you with some answers.
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on 8 September 2014
Nice book, bought as first time dad, very interesting read, some far out there ideas and ideals, not sure how you would implement them in this day and age lol
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