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Customer reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
15
4.5 out of 5 stars
Mistress
Format: Hardcover|Change


on 3 November 2017
I really loved this book, it had a great story line and equally great characters. I loved the humour that ran through this and the little interactions between the characters. Amelia was a good character who I really feel could have had her own book, one of my favourite scenes with her is when she's trying to stop Marcus and Iphiginia from bickering, good comedic fun.

Iphiginia was a strong female character who stayed true to herself no matter what. Marcus was wonderful, he had so many good scenes, from their first meeting in the ballroom to the one at the 'Drs', and so many fabulous lines which gave you an insight to him; his sense of humour and desires. My favourite line of his: "You have taught me to break most of my other rules, Iphiginia, teach me to break this one, too", gorgeous!
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on 20 October 2017
Can't compare at all with Dangerous or Ravished, some other books from the same writer.
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on 18 February 2007
Amanda Quick has written an awful lot of Regencies and over time the similarities become apparent; her heroes all have harsh faces, are rather alpha male, for some reason believe they can't love and deflower the heroine before marriage. The heroines are usually bluestocking women who aren't conventionally attractive but are witty and singleminded. There's also usually some kind of mystery to be solved that helps bring hero and heroine together.

Mistress is another such book. It started off very well, with the Earl of Masters, Marcus Cloud, discovering that a woman named Mrs Bright is going around in society in London saying that she is his latest mistress and that they have quarrelled. Masters knows very well she isn't - he has never met her - but he's intrigued enough to return to London from his estates in Yorkshire to find out what's going on.

When he arrives at a Ball that Iphiginia Bright is attending she is more than slightly startled - she had been informed by a blackmailer that Masters had been murdered. He walks in, sweeps her off her feet (literally, not emotionally) and delivers her home, asking her why she's masquerading as his mistress. She explains the blackmail plot and although he doesn't initially believe her one of his other friends soon becomes a target of the same blackmailer and so he and Iphiginia join forces.

Amanda Quick (aka Jayne Ann Krentz and Jayne Castle) likes to add mystery plots to her regencies and I suppose it gives an extra focus for the book but so often in her books, and this is one of them, it's all too easily solved. Despite our heroine being rather a bluestocking (a former schoolmistress) she seems to see everything rather simply and in a black and white manner. In fact the whole book is like this - nothing deep and complicated; Iphiginia sets up an investment pool and of course it is wildly successful, she decides that a lady that Masters' brother Bennet likes is right for him on an acquaintance of about two seconds and she pushes her way into Masters' life, causing him to break some of the rules by which he lives his life, with little reflection as to whether they might actually serve him well. We also have the traditional Amanda Quick heroine giving up her virginity at the drop of a hat, having saved it up for ages.

Amanda Quick's regencies are not ones to read for historical accuracy. Our characters call each other by their first names, they speak American rather than English to each other, they talk in rather 20th century words about love and other stuff and their sexual morality definitely doesn't feel like that of the Regency period. But if you just want a fun and fluffy book to read this one will probably do.
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on 9 June 1999
This was the first Amanda Quick book I read. I've read at least 5 more since -- Scandal, Surrender, Ravished, Deception, and Dangerous. Her books are really wonderful, she brings her spirited characters to life, and each story has lots of intrigue! Try her, you'll love it!
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on 18 February 2007
Amanda Quick has written an awful lot of Regencies and over time the similarities become apparent; her heroes all have harsh faces, are rather alpha male, for some reason believe they can't love and deflower the heroine before marriage. The heroines are usually bluestocking women who aren't conventionally attractive but are witty and singleminded. There's also usually some kind of mystery to be solved that helps bring hero and heroine together.

Mistress is another such book. It started off very well, with the Earl of Masters, Marcus Cloud, discovering that a woman named Mrs Bright is going around in society in London saying that she is his latest mistress and that they have quarrelled. Masters knows very well she isn't - he has never met her - but he's intrigued enough to return to London from his estates in Yorkshire to find out what's going on.

When he arrives at a Ball that Iphiginia Bright is attending she is more than slightly startled - she had been informed by a blackmailer that Masters had been murdered. He walks in, sweeps her off her feet (literally, not emotionally) and delivers her home, asking her why she's masquerading as his mistress. She explains the blackmail plot and although he doesn't initially believe her one of his other friends soon becomes a target of the same blackmailer and so he and Iphiginia join forces.

Amanda Quick (aka Jayne Ann Krentz and Jayne Castle) likes to add mystery plots to her regencies and I suppose it gives an extra focus for the book but so often in her books, and this is one of them, it's all too easily solved. Despite our heroine being rather a bluestocking (a former schoolmistress) she seems to see everything rather simply and in a black and white manner. In fact the whole book is like this - nothing deep and complicated; Iphiginia sets up an investment pool and of course it is wildly successful, she decides that a lady that Masters' brother Bennet likes is right for him on an acquaintance of about two seconds and she pushes her way into Masters' life, causing him to break some of the rules by which he lives his life, with little reflection as to whether they might actually serve him well. We also have the traditional Amanda Quick heroine giving up her virginity at the drop of a hat, having saved it up for ages.

Amanda Quick's regencies are not ones to read for historical accuracy. Our characters call each other by their first names, they speak American rather than English to each other, they talk in rather 20th century words about love and other stuff and their sexual morality definitely doesn't feel like that of the Regency period. But if you just want a fun and fluffy book to read this one will probably do.
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on 3 August 1999
I have read several Krentz/Quick novels, and although they seem fairly repetative (headstrong, virginal woman; remote, masterful, harshly handsome hero), this one stood out. for those who liked this, I recommend "Trust Me"...it's a modern book under the Krentz name, but it shares many of the same themes.
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on 8 December 2005
Blackmail, murder, a headstrong heroine and a intriging hero. A real good book. Not to be missed!!
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on 20 July 1999
This is the first A.Q. book I've read so far and I already love her books!
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on 3 May 2014
Another good read. Good characters. Good story. Well written and grammatically correct - no sloppy sentence construction or unnecessary dialogue
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on 25 March 2016
Just great fun, brilliant characters. Exasperated men, feisty women and dastardly baddies. Just what I'm after in entertaining reading!!
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