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on 7 June 2003
As Abbie herself says, she's 'like some kind of spiritual fly-paper'. In Susan Davis's previous book, 'The Henry Game', the spirit bothering Abbie and her teenage friends was Henry the Eighth. (Who can forget the image of Henry, in biker leathers, whizzing around the Wall of Death on his motorbike?!) Henry liked women too much. The same can't be said of Abbie's new spiritual pest: Matthew Hopkins, Witchfinder General (aka 'The Creep').
It's Abbie's new schoolfriend, Delilah, whose use of minor spells brings Hopkins into her life and that of her eczema-plagued friend Lauren. Unfortunately, it's not going to be easy to get rid of him. There are other problems too. Delilah's religious stepfather is making her life miserable with his puritanical ideas. Then there's hunky Joel, Delilah's brother and Abbie's new love interest. Could their budding romance be real or due merely to that love spell involving a gladiolus bulb?
By turns funny and spookily foreboding, 'Delilah and the Dark Stuff' contains enough witchcraft to get it banned in schools across America. Susan Davis deftly captures the mannerisms, preoccupations (boys, piercings, skincare, stepdads), sassy dialogue, and insulting nicknames ('The Loathsome Verne', 'Crud Cottage', 'Flopshire') of teenage girls. And the misogynistic Hopkins, a spirit who poses a real physical threat to our heroines, and who in Davis's capable hands makes the flesh crawl, brings tangible suspense to this pacy, enjoyable read.
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on 21 June 2003
As Abbie herself says, she's 'like some kind of spiritual fly-paper'. In Susan Davis's previous book, 'The Henry Game', the spirit bothering Abbie and her teenage friends was Henry the Eighth. (Who can forget the image of Henry, in biker leathers, whizzing around the Wall of Death on his motorbike?!) Henry liked women too much. The same can't be said of Abbie's new spiritual pest: Matthew Hopkins, Witchfinder General (aka 'The Creep').
It's Abbie's new schoolfriend, Delilah, whose use of minor spells brings Hopkins into her life and that of her eczema-plagued friend Lauren. Unfortunately, it's not going to be easy to get rid of him. There are other problems too. Delilah's religious stepfather is making her life miserable with his puritanical ideas. Then there's hunky Joel, Delilah's brother and Abbie's new love interest. Could their budding romance be real or due merely to that love spell involving a gladiolus bulb?
'Delilah and the Dark Stuff' is by turns comic and spookily foreboding. Susan Davis deftly captures the mannerisms, preoccupations (boys, piercings, skincare, stepdads), sassy dialogue, and insulting nicknames ('The Loathsome Verne', 'Crud Cottage', 'Flopshire') of teenage girls. And the misogynistic Hopkins, a spirit who poses a real physical threat to our heroines, and who in Davis's capable hands makes the flesh crawl, brings tangible suspense to this pacy, enjoyable read.
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on 18 October 2012
This is my favourite of Susan Davis's spooky trilogy about Abbie and her friends. The new character Delilah is a wonderfully funny and believable creation. If you haven't tried these books, you have a treat in store. Aimed at teens, but just as entertaining for adults.
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on 20 July 2003
Susan Davis has practically created her own genre: the humorous teenage thriller. Mixing comedy with horror is such a tricky balance, but she does it exceedingly well, walking a perfect tightrope between the two without deflating one or the other. There are genuinely creepy bits here, along with laugh-out-loud dialogue from her brilliantly drawn teenage protagonists. Really a must for anyone who has an interest in the supernatural - or just likes quality teenage fiction. A spine-tingling, pacey read with real charm and humour. Bring on the next one!
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on 5 June 2003
Normally when sequals arrive they tend to dissapoint, not so it Susan Davis' case. This book is an astonishing follow-up to The Henry Game and expands expertly on the themes and topics of the first, namely relationships and life in general. Susan is truly an extraordinary writer, making the characters practically jump off the page. A definate must-buy.
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on 8 October 2006
Funny, spooky and yet historical, I thought that this book was a great sequel to The Henry Game.

Abby and Lauren befriend the new girl in their class, Delilah. Delilah is actually a witch and is being followed by The Witchfinder General, Matthew Hopkins, and all three girls soon find themslves in trouble again....
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on 18 June 2003
My daughter could not put this one down, a must read, which is witty, thrilling and extremely well written. Hopefully there will be another one soon!
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