Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 6 June 2017
This was one of the last, "classic" Pratchett Discworld novels, before his illness began to effect his work. Vimes is my favourite character, a born Copper who would arrest the Gods themselves if he could. It's fascinating to read the City Watch novels in order, and follow Vimes' slow transformation from cynical drunk commanding a useless and forgetton Night Watch to one of the richest and most powerful men in the city.

Vimes is some ways resembles Granny Weatherwax; both secretly fear the darkness within themselves, and gain much of their power through denying it. Vimes calls this side of himself, "the Beast". While it can be useful in combat, granting Vimes a kind of Berserker fury, he worries that he might give into it completely. To avoid this, Vimes has created a kind of internal Watchman to keep the Beast on a leash.

In this novel, Vimes and a serial killer named Carcer are sent back in time due to a magical accident. They arrive around thirty years in the past, when Vimes was a raw recruit, and Ankh-Morpork was on the brink of revolution. Vimes must protect his younger self, capture Carcer and return to the present. And do it all without changing the past too much.

We meet younger versions of the regular cast, so to speak; Nobby, Colon, Reg Shoe, Mrs Palm, CMOT Dibbler and even Vetinari and Downey. The History Monks, aka The Men in Saffron, aka No Such Monastery also play a prominant role.

Noticably less overtly humorous than many Discworld novels, with a bitter-sweet edge to the writing. A book I've read many times and still take pleasure from.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 July 2017
This, THIS is Terry Pratchett's apotheosis. Humane, funny, heartfelt, tragic and glorious, he never wrote better. Sam Vimes, everyman and hero, the unwilling aristocrat with cardboard-soled boots trapped in twisted time-travel tale that would trouble a Tardis, messing with the Men in Saffron and a truly indefensible villain, fixing his own future and the meaning of the lilac blossom: John Keel indeed! And a (moderately) heroic doctor!!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 January 2017
Sir Samuel Vimes, hero not only in the Century of the Bat but of the past too.
How even when the old boss leaves the new one is just the same, the madness of men but the sanity of a man.
This is a much darker story than usual but is a brilliant one all the same.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 January 2017
Brilliant!
I went to bed at 10 to read for 1/2 hour.
It's 1/4 to 2am now and it's finished.
Just couldn't put it down. Night Watch indeed!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 August 2017
Typical Pratchett with an all seeing eye to detail that not many other authors can share. Vimes at his finest protecting the city and some shonky old geezer messing around with time.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 May 2017
One of the best Discworld novels, read, the re-read ! Sam Vimes has to be one of the best fictional characters ever created.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 June 2017
This was for my husband, he has the book but wanted an audio version too. Brillaint !
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 March 2017
A darker, grittier tale this one but still Pratchett. Excellent characters, some good laughs & the overall feel of being wrapped in a warm duvet, Recommended
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 July 2017
Commander Vimes begats himself
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 March 2017
good value
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse