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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
218
4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 30 September 2013
Classic Vimes pure and simple - clever, funny and well written with a great story that kept me reading page after page
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on 6 December 2000
one of his best books with technical information about the demise of the fifth elephant right down to the crispy bits
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on 12 January 2016
One of Terry's best Vimes stories. Such exacting parodies of our modern world all told with so much wit and humour
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on 24 December 2013
A good Sam Vimes, Ankh - Morpok City watch tale with all the familiar characters, puns quips and plot twists
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on 25 January 2014
Terry Pritchett at his finest great fun I would recommend this book to friends and family both young and old
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on 7 August 2015
Good story line plus introduction of new characters -Igor - ,I love the watch series, so sad 😢 no more
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on 17 December 2015
present for a friend so can't really say anything except it is what they wanted and enjoyed reading it
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on 15 August 2013
Another good book, like all Terry's novels I found it hard to put down. It is an entertaining read. .
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on 20 October 2000
When 'The Fifth Elephant' was first published, I was under the impression that I had to read 'Jingo' first. Although this is not entirely necessary, I didn't mind reading even more of the Watch, particularly with Vimes and Angua. After the frankly shocking 'Carpe Jugulum', with it's seemingly never ending list of dark characters and implications, I was looking forward to reading Pratchett's portrayal of Werewolves in this novel. It was interesting to find out more, both about the darker side of Angua's life, and the pretty confusing laws of the dwarfs. I also liked the use of the different characters, as in Jingo, Pratchett doesn't, here stick just to one subject. I found the switching from Vimes' circumstances and that of Colon and the rest of the Watch in Ank-Morpork, sort of refreshing. The thought of Wolfgang, and the other Werewolves, being unstoppable, built up the tension, thankfully, towards the end of the book, close to what I see as the main event of Vimes being hunted down. This tension was created, and sustained in a number of ways. The first was the idea that the enemy, the werewolves as was finally discovered, could not be beaten by the person who appears to the best for the job, i.e Inigo Skimmer (Have I remembered that name right?), as he was killed quite simply. Secondly, the person who is able to actually fight the wolves with any hope of victory is another werewolf, Angua. Yet again as in any Watch novel, I was surprised by the way the crime was solved, and what the crimes actually were. As usual, Pratchett has the impressive ability of making his main character here, Sam Vimes, find several out of place facts, inconsistencies and obvious impossibilities, and somehow weaves them in to something ludicrously plausible, and, it seems, undoubtedly true.
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on 10 September 2000
When 'The Fifth Elephant' was first published, I was under the impression that I had to read 'Jingo' first. Although this is not entirely necessary, I didn't mind reading even more of the Watch, particularly with Vimes and Angua. After the frankly shocking 'Carpe Jugulum', with it's seemingly never ending list of dark characters and implications, I was looking forward to reading Pratchett's portrayal of Werewolves in this novel. It was interesting to find out more, both about the darker side of Angua's life, and the pretty confusing laws of the dwarfs. I also liked the use of the different characters, as in Jingo, Pratchett doesn't, here stick just to one subject. I found the switching from Vimes' circumstances and that of Colon and the rest of the Watch in Ank-Morpork, sort of refreshing. The thought of Wolfgang, and the other Werewolves, being unstoppable, built up the tension, thankfully, towards the end of the book, close to what I see as the main event of Vimes being hunted down. This tension was created, and sustained in a number of ways. The first was the idea that the enemy, the werewolves as was finally discovered, could not be beaten by the person who appears to the best for the job, i.e Inigo Skimmer (Have I remembered that name right?), as he was killed quite simply. Secondly, the person who is able to actually fight the wolves with any hope of victory is another werewolf, Angua. Yet again as in any Watch novel, I was surprised by the way the crime was solved, and what the crimes actually were. As usual, Pratchett has the impressive ability of making his main character here, Sam Vimes, find several out of place facts, inconsistencies and obvious impossibilities, and somehow weaves them in to something ludicrously plausible, and it seems, undoubtedly true.
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