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on 19 April 2017
Bit of a slog to read. It is Virginia Woolf's last novel. Somehow her impending suicide hangs more heavily over it than the Second World War which had already started. It feels like a pre-War, almost Edwardian novel.
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on 19 June 2014
Woolf's writing style may not be everyone's cup of tea but if you can get her writers voice inside your head you will be transported to the imaginary world she creates. It's not a detective novel. It reflects rather than leads. Wonderful. The ending is profound.
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on 7 October 2015
Great
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on 17 October 2014
Good quality, really good book.
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on 20 July 2015
Nice Product & Good Service
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on 26 February 2017
So far so good!
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on 27 May 2017
Excellent value for money and sent really promptly
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on 14 March 2017
I haven't finished the book as yet but the jacket is beautifully presented.
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VINE VOICEon 29 April 2011
Reading Between the Acts is a little like walking through an art gallery and seeing a succession of beautiful paintings, each of which catches a fleeting moment from life. Woolf was superb at creating a tapestry of 'impressions', moments caught in amber, all separate and yet all, when skillfully stitched together, forming part of one magnificent whole.

The novel catches the thoughts, memories, loves and fears of a group of people over one day in the summer of 1939. War looms, it's in the air, rumbling like an approaching storm, but while the sunshine remains the characters in Woolf's novel focus their attentions on more personal matters - they gossip, they moan, they present one emotion on the surface while feeling quite another deep down; they flirt while simultaneously being too afraid, or two restricted by the conventions of society, to admit their love. Summer blooms, butterflies rest in sunlight, flowers in vases catch the light.

There is a deep love of nature in this novel and, I would argue, a deep love of England. While Miss La Trobe hurries her actors and actresses into presenting their play - a series of scenes from various eras in English history - for the annual village pageant the movement of sunshine across hills and through the leaves of trees, along with the sights and sounds of nature, all merge together to form an exquisite rural backdrop to the lives of the village inhabitants. It is the descriptions, and the fashion in which Woolf catches the fleeting impressions of her characters as they watch the play, that bring the novel to life. Also some of the 'human' moments are beautifully handled: Mrs Swithin showing a visitor the nursery in Pointz Hall where she herself, many decades ago, used to play as a child is deeply moving because it catches beautifully the evanescence of life, the swift inexorable passage of the hours.

The fact the novel isn't quite as experimental as The Waves or To the Lighthouse counts in its favour. The relative lack of experimentation means the novel is perhaps more gentle as a result, more human somehow. This was Woolf's last novel, which adds a certain poignancy to the reflections she voices through her characters, but as a hymn to a way of life that was about to be torn apart, and as a meditation upon one last perfect summer, it is utterly beautiful.
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on 4 February 2013
it was falling to bits and yellow not as described in good condition I like the story but not as much as rpevious books by the author
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