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on 11 November 2010
I put this book in the same category at Terry Smith's "Accounting for Growth" which changed the way the world looked at company reporting. Though most of the creative accounting that Terry Smith referred to has been cleaned up the same cannot be said of the tricks and swerves found in Megaprojects and Major Programs. Anyone who is a practitioner on a megaproject probably already knew what was going on but Flyvbjerg and Bruzelius have gone to the trouble of quantifying it and providing us with evidence. The book also takes a long overdue sideswipe at poor quality risk proceesses and makes a good case for much more effective and open project appraisal. So in summary like Accounting for Growth this book dares to cast a light on some very costly and unsavoury practices that society leaders indulge in at our cost and with no comebacks. In a properly functioning democracy it would be acted on by the media and taxpayers to put the brakes on politicians and other grand visionaries who are fond of using other people' money to build monuments to their vanity. Finally, this book introduced me to the theory of "optimism bias" which, I have witnessed at close proximity in IT projects for 25 years without realising what it was. For that alone I am grateful. So, there it is. One of two books that I have read that successfully summed up a subject that truly stinks. Terry Smith cleaned up a mess and built a career on Accounting for Growth. I hope the authors do the same with Megaprojects and Risk.
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on 24 December 2005
Finally, I have found a book that examines the risk profile as a result of misinformation.
Though written with mega projects in mind, I’m sure that most of us working in projects can recognize the same problems occurring on minor projects.
This book should be mandatory reading for politicians, project managers and other stakeholders on any given project.
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on 22 December 2016
Excellent Book. Interesting detail: on the inside it says printed by Amazon Poland and on the cover it says printed in the United Kingdom. I couldn't care less where they print it - just a funny detail. Doesn't change the quality of the content.

Another, rather interesting details, is that the book has 207 pages of which 57 pages are references - hence only 150 pages are content. This is academically correct writing but still, makes a light book.
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on 13 November 2016
The projects used as examples are dated. But the issues raised are current although the.book could be half the size and make the same points
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on 30 April 2010
Highly recommended for academics and practitioners alike.
Mega-projects are here to stay. Deal with them!
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on 20 January 2016
Very useful book, for planners and academics alike.
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