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Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
"Youthquake" was a term coined by Diana Vreeland, editor-in-chief of US Vogue to describe the seismic shift that was to take place as the youth market became the dominant force in determining the direction of the fashion industry during the sixties.

Jonathan Walford's book provides an almost season-by-season narrative of the huge changes that were to come about as the decade unfolded; the move away from couture and the rise of boutique fashion - cheap, affordable style, influenced by ethnic/Pop culture and driven by new production markets, fabrics and an affluent, assertive young consumer-base. Although the development of various styles and trends are the main topic, Walford takes the time to set fashion within the wider cultural context of art, music, film and social change; there is an emphasis on developments in London and the USA, and women's fashion dominates (men's styles get one brief chapter of their own) but that is to be expected given the period.
The book contains 306 illustrations with 176 in colour; a nice selection of contemporary fashion photos, design sketches, trade advertising and mannequin displays. I would have liked a little more correlation between text and the examples presented, but on the whole the overview works well.

This is a well-presented and fairly inclusive study of the subject; a cut above what could easily be seen as another coffee-table book. A good and informative general historical survey of a watershed decade for fashion.
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VINE VOICEon 29 December 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Album-sized and crammed with images, the majority of which are in colour, this is arguably one of the best books on the Sixties - let alone fashion - I've seen. Comprehensive in both editorial and visual study, I'd recommend this for anyone interested in that most transformative of decades, let alone a fashion or pop culture student.

For fashion students however, this is a must. When I was at art college during the late 80s and early 90s, Thames & Hudson were the kings of art books - so it's great to see them taking on fashion in such an immersive way. Occasionally its a bit dry for the curious, but the sheer interconnectedness and wealth of imagery more than makes up for this. And whoever picture researched this book deserves a medal, because it's crammed with new and highly illuminative shots - both of fashion on the streets, as well as a heap of catalogue and advertising material that really prove how much ground was covered in ten short years.

Coming in from the late 50s (and therefore showing what the 60s inherited), the book breaks down into seven major chapters, covering the rise and fall of labels and department stores; statistics help put the industry into global context, and it's possible to chart the importance of print media (and pop) on spreading fashion to the masses. There's also some lost treasures in here, such as the brief attempt to launch paper clothing - and while that might sound a bit weird, wait until you see the images included here: they're a pop art lover's dream.

A highly, highly recommended book!
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on 18 December 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I have a few books that could be referred to as `Coffee Table Books'. The type of things that is so large that it could be used as a coffee table itself. Most of these books are filled with pretty colour pictures, but don't always have the written content you may expect from such a large tome. Not so `Sixties Fashion: From 'Less is More' to Youthquake' by Jonathan Walford, this is a glossy full colour book about 60s fashion that is as much about the history of the clothing as it is about the imagery.

`Sixties Fashion' is the type of artistic, yet informative, book that would suit someone keen to know a little more about the era, or an Undergraduate student. It goes into some detail on various different fashion ideals of the time and tries to explain a little of how they came about and what they represented. Many of these sections are coupled with a few images from that trend. Who can forget the paper dress, nice idea; just don't go out in the rain.

The only real issue I have with `Sixties Fashion' is that the demographic who will find it the most useful is very narrow. For the layperson, the book is a little too full of text and although full of imagery, there are better examples out there for just visuals. In turn, a more advanced student will find the text a little too basic. However, if you are amongst that group who wants to delve deeper into understanding fashion history then this is a great starting point; informative and colourful, covering a wide range of fashions from the era.
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on 11 January 2014
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
With a mixture of chronological and thematic chapters, "Sixties Fashion" analyses a decade which 'saw the death of fashion and the rise of style'. The biggest change traced by the book is the decline of couture bespoke clothing and the rise of boutiques and ready-to-wear. This change was hastened by the introduction of clothes marketed particularly for 15 to 25 year olds in a decade characterized by mods, 'ye ye' girls, discotheques, miniskirts, and hippies. The focus is chiefly on women's fashion (men's fashion gets one, very short, chapter) and Western Europe and North America. I would have loved to see a chapter on what less well-off older people wore on an everyday basis, but then maybe that's outside the remit of a book which has 'fashion' rather than 'clothing' in the title.

"Sixties Fashion" has a wealth of high-quality images, encompassing fashion photographs, advertising, and images of outfits on dummies. The accompanying text is well-researched, but occasionally I found my eyes glazing over, especially in the chronological chapters.
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VINE VOICEon 27 November 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
What is particularly good about this book is that the clothes themselves are very well reproduced. Alongside archive photographs of the items being worn, the book is filled with photographs of the items themselves, usually on mannequins, reproduced often full-page, so that the reader has the opportunity to examine the fabric, the patterns and the way the clothes hang. The photographs of the garments on the mannequins mostly come from the Fashion History Museum in Ontario and are worth the price of the book alone.

As an overview of women's fashion in the 1960s, the book is certainly thorough. The author, Jonathan Walford, certainly knows his stuff. I am an enthusiast for retro clothing and I learned a lot from the book. I am sure that even fashion historians would come away from reading this book having gleaned new insights into the way fashion developed over the 10 years of the 1960s. Men's fashion doesn't get much of a look-in, which is a shame, given how ground-breaking men's fashion was in the 1960s, perhaps a companion volume looking specifically at menswear would be a good idea?

A gorgeous book, elegantly designed and written with obvious love for and knowledge of the subject. A great gift for any fashion fan!
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 17 December 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Mostly featuring haute couture of the period, and female fashion at that, this is a serious and wide-ranging study of the catwalk styles and fashions of the era. It does branch out on occasion into street fashion and the odd reference to shoes and hats, but it's main focus is on the styles which were likely seldom worn in the street. You're not going to see what Jack and Jill Public were wearing to walk down to the town to do their grocery shopping in.

There are plenty of photos, mostly in colour, and the text woven around them leads you through the history of that decade of fashion with an authoritative and convincing air. The author clearly knows his sixties fashion very well, or has done his research in a great deal of detail.

A weighty and very good quality hard-backed volume, it certainly represents good value for money at its current advertised price, but its target market is likely to be reasonably limited to film wardrobe designers, fashion historians and design students with an interest in sixties fashion.

If it sounds like it's for you, then it probably is.
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VINE VOICEon 8 December 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
My wife responded with a cry of joy when I gave here this book to look at and comment on, and I watched her as she opened and thumbed through it with a developing smile on her face. She loved it! She has now had a more in depth study and is still as delighted as she was on that initial view. Yes we are survivors of the swinging sixties and she kept saying, "Ooh I had one like that" as she read through the book.

The volume is richly illustrated with wonderful colour pictures, and the entire production is a credit to Thames & Hudson, the publishers, and Jonathan Walford the author. The text is authoritative, although on occasions, and with my 'noughties' head and not my sixties one I realise that at times it verges on hyperbole. The image of Shrimpton on page 159 is the one I remember (or very like it) and is as iconic as they get, but one could say that about many of these pictures.

A great reference book and a fun coffee table tome, and a real bargain at £20 or thereabouts.
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Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This book is an excellent read, and is accompanied by an endless collection of high quality pictures. It marks the decade in a single transition; where technology and culture each influenced how designers considered their work. The author describes does a decent job of completing this almost in story-like fashion, but is perfectly summarised as the end of fashion and the beginning of style.

Even if you don't have time to read each chapter, the book still makes an excellent 'coffee table' piece due to the depth of its images. Clearly a lot of time and research have been put into collecting these photographs and graphics, but I expected little else from Thames and Hudson, who are one of the best publishers on the market.

I can imagine this book would be perfect for any fashion students out there, as it not only offers inspiration, but it packed with excellent information to cite.
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VINE VOICEon 27 November 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This book came as a pleasant surprise: I was expecting the archetypal coffee-table book, all shiny pictures and little substance, but what I got was shiny pictures AND a fascinating documentary upon the fashion scene in the nineteen-sixties. I was particularly pleased that it did not just take a view of fashion from a date towards the end of the sixties and play to our amusement at the wacky styles then prevalent. The book starts at the very beginning of the decade and shows clearly the way that the well known sixties look came into being.

I lived through the sixties, and was young enough not to have been offered any of the mind altering 'experiences' which lead to the famous quote, "If you can remember the sixties, you weren't there." This book certainly seems to cover the fashion world through this period pretty faithfully. There were many short lived styles that I had completely forgotten but, which this book puts into context. I have no knowledge of, or real interest in the fashion business; for me, this book is an interesting piece of social history but, I would imagine that it would be invaluable to anyone looking at the history of fashion and, as I said of myself, great for anybody just keen to understand more about a crucial period in our history.
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Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Well this is a surprise. A book that looks like one of those fabulous coffee-table books from DK, but is from Thames and Hudson. It is a fabulous-looking book, a great reference work for anyone interested in fashion.

This is the author's fifth dip into fashion, his previous outings being into the fashions of the 1940s, 1950s, and shoes. He writes with friendly authority, giving a thorough account of 1960s fashions, their origins and their designers. However, the text mostly gives way to page after page of fabulous images, showing the outfits in all their whacky, colourful, striking sixties glory. We get a good look at everything from Mods to Twiggy, and every key fashion development along the way.

If you are interested in fashion, this is surely a must-have book. I've seen no better work, or at least no better-looking work, on this subject. For anyone who lived through the sixties, this is walk down memory lane. For everyone else, this is a book that will have you gaping at the anything-goes creativity that electrified the era.

Buy it. Buy it now!
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