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on 7 February 2017
Very heavy and large edition of this book. Look forward to reading it!
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on 17 February 2004
When I first opened this book, with the exterior looking bleak and boring, I was fairly apprehensive. Yet after reading the first page I knew I had brought a book that would transform the way I feel and see travel journals. Twain recalls his memories of his round-the-world trip in an enthrawling and exciting manner leaving the reader drouling and dreaming of visiting such places as he did. The sensual words and phrases he uses capture the very essence of what it would be like to stand where he stood in the places of the unknown, in 19th century Earth. His truly brave and unbelievable journey has urged me to personally invest my earnings on visiting some of the places as he did. If someone can make me (with printed words) visit the other side of the world how can anyone dismiss this as a bad book? Don't think, buy this book!
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on 31 March 2008
What an amazing record by a man so ahead of his time! His political commentaries and critical observations are subtle yet caustic and nearly always conveyed with his wonderful sense of humour! A pleasure to read...
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on 2 June 2014
Mark Twain's reputation travels with him in this jumbled mix of anecdotes, travel tales and chance encounters along the way. He allows his imagination to run riot inbetween hilarious descriptions of people and places such as the time Satan introduced him to God. He reminisces, speculates and passes judgement on all that he experiences. It is very much an insight into his thinking and ideas of the nineteenth century and some of his accounts make uncomfortable reading in the twenty-first century, particularly attitudes concerning the Australian aboriginies and native people in Tasmania. He certainly described places that very few people had the opportunity to visit, or if they did very few people wrote about honestly.
I recommend it as a historical account written by someone who is not afraid of expressing his opinions. I was left thinking the publishers accepted his book without bothering to edit anything, therefore cannot give it a full 5 stars.
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on 27 August 2014
Like all Mark Twain's travel books - and the novels for that matter - it is hugely entertaining and perceptive. Mixing fictional accounts in with the factual stuff, it is a hugely entertaining read, exposing all the human foibles in a style that still reads well 120 years later.
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on 25 September 2014
excellent if dated (naturally) but a good read nevertheless. Good seller all round.
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on 3 January 2014
Mark Twain has a unique humour that glides through this book. He goes places and meets people because of his position as a lecturer and famous writer, which he otherwise would not have. And we, the readers, benefit from this. It is a view like no other of selected places around the world. Some leave good memories, some not, like to any other traveller.
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on 28 July 2014
I've already read two-thirds of this book so far and can't help but be enamoured with it. I'd read Mark Twain's first travelogue "The Innocents Abroad" and that is a treasure in itself. (In fact due to its subject matter it should be in the world's heritage books list - if it isn't already!) However in this, his last utterly absorbing travelogue, written 20 years later, I'm really enjoying Twain's smooth and effortlessly sophisticated prose style. It is also fascinating to read of Hawaii, Australia, India, etc He introduces us to Cecil Rhodes in his tales of Australia and from what I saw the book virtually ends with a eulogy to this empire builder since South Africa is his final destination on the tour! He manages to describe everything (even bird songs!) SO well without the aid of pictures and diagrams. His descriptions are utterly brilliant! I have every intention of reading this book again.
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on 24 January 2016
I read Twain's account of travelling through Europe and even though there were some boring parts there, I was rewarded with some real pearls of fantasticly hilarious writing. Following the equator had hardly any good parts, I was so dissapointed
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