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on 24 November 2016
Good little book .my husband says its for america but he can also use the info for uk .Interesting subject
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on 13 June 2009
The only thing wrong with this book which is easy to read and makes some excellent points is that much of Gardiner's work is not really new. Many others have recognised, Holt, Goodman etc. that schools are not ideal in their present form as mass educators simply because we are all different. This only comes as a surprise to a group of unenlightened educational administrators too busy getting on to see what was really going on. The parable of the talents is over 2000 years old so Gardiner with his multiple intelligence theory simply makes the blindingly obvious obscure and esoteric. The positive is that at last some of the educational establishment are awakening but as usual have got hold of the wrong end of the stick. It is sadly not just the children have unschooled minds. A worthy book making worthy points that may eventually lead to real progress but not quickly I venture.
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on 10 March 1999
This is important reading for all teachers and administrators. Gardner provides powerful insights into why schools aren't producing students with the skills to solve problems in real-life settings. His ideas help us examine how schools today could effectively teach for understanding.
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on 29 December 2013
I bought this book as part of a course reading list, but unlike most books on the list, I ended up reading it cover to cover.

Gardner puts some really interesting points forward about what it means to really understand something, and how our education system is not geered towards achieving this, instead being focused on getting kids to jump through hoops. Although it sounds like common sense, Gardner really takes this point a lot further than I can articulate in this review, and says a whole lot more too. Overall, this is far more than the general PGCE / M.Ed reading list title which is only good for a few quotes, its actually a book worth reading for anyone involved in education.

Given the opportunity, I would strap Michael Gove to the ground and force him to listen to listen to a few passages from this book (alongside, perhaps, a few choice passages of my own 'personal wisdom').
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on 10 March 1999
This is important reading for all teachers and administrators. Gardner provides powerful insights into why schools aren't producing students with the skills to solve problems in real-life settings. His ideas help us examine how schools today could effectively teach for understanding.
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on 19 August 2014
Excellent, as with all I've read by Gardner.
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on 13 July 2013
In good shape.I haven't read it yet. But probably I'll purchase more of the same guy. Lots of tips for my job.
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