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on 2 September 2005
The opening of this book really irritated me. The very statement that people on the autism/Asperger's (a/A) spectrum don't relate to others and that nothing registers is not only untrue, but is a harmful misstatement. People with autism, which is a neurobiological condition have difficulty communicating and responding to stimuli based on the severity of the condition. Suggesting that nothing registers with people who have autism is a crock.
I also didn't like the way people with autism were compared to Rain Man. Seriously, I wish that 1988 movie had never been made because I am really sick of the savant stereotype being dumped on the autistic population! The term "Rain Man" has become a slur in many a/A circles for this very reason. The irony of it all is that savantism only affects less than 10% of people with autism! I also wish I had an umbrella with the Autism Puzzle design, with the logo "Rain Man Busters" to ward off these tired misstatements. Saying one knows about autism based on one fictitious character is tantamount to saying that one has been to Paris when they've only been to Charles De Gaulle Airport!
Many parts of this book really bothered me. The "facilitated communication" technique is praised throughout the book as the key to Birger Sellin, an individual with severe autism. Sellin is nonverbal and has allegedly been able to communicate via poetry through this method.
There are too many unanswered questions about facilitated communication. This book fails to mention that in the majority of cases, the facilitator's hand is typing the messages and that it is the facilitator's thoughts that are being expressed, not those of the person with autism. In 99% of the controlled studies performed on this method of communication have shown this to be the case. In many instances, the facilitator forcibly holds the person with autism's hand down on the keys to make it appear that the the person with autism is doing the typing.
Small wonder Sellin's meltdowns and extreme frustration appear to be exacerbated since the advent of facilitated communication in his life. One wonders if Sellin is actually doing the typing. At no time are these questions addressed in this book.
Don't just take this with a grain of salt. Take it with a whole BOX of salt!
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on 2 September 2005
The opening of this book really irritated me. The very statement that people on the autism/Asperger's (a/A) spectrum don't relate to others and that nothing registers is not only untrue, but is a harmful misstatement. People with autism, which is a neurobiological condition have difficulty communicating and responding to stimuli based on the severity of the condition. Suggesting that nothing registers with people who have autism is a crock.
I also didn't like the way people with autism were compared to Rain Man. Seriously, I wish that 1988 movie had never been made because I am really sick of the savant stereotype being dumped on the autistic population! The term "Rain Man" has become a slur in many a/A circles for this very reason. The irony of it all is that savantism only affects less than 10% of people with autism! I also wish I had an umbrella with the Autism Puzzle design, with the logo "Rain Man Busters" to ward off these tired misstatements. Saying one knows about autism based on one fictitious character is tantamount to saying that one has been to Paris when they've only been to Charles De Gaulle Airport!
Many parts of this book really bothered me. The "facilitated communication" technique is praised throughout the book as the key to Birger Sellin, an individual with severe autism. Sellin is nonverbal and has allegedly been able to communicate via poetry through this method.
There are too many unanswered questions about facilitated communication. This book fails to mention that in the majority of cases, the facilitator's hand is typing the messages and that it is the facilitator's thoughts that are being expressed, not those of the person with autism. In 99% of the controlled studies performed on this method of communication have shown this to be the case. In many instances, the facilitator forcibly holds the person with autism's hand down on the keys to make it appear that the the person with autism is doing the typing.
Small wonder Sellin's meltdowns and extreme frustration appear to be exacerbated since the advent of facilitated communication in his life. One wonders if Sellin is actually doing the typing. At no time are these questions addressed in this book.
Don't just take this with a grain of salt. Take it with a whole BOX of salt!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


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