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on 30 August 2017
This is a very powerful story of what went on in Nanking about how the people there were treated by the Japanese. it made me cry and am very angry to think humans can treat other humans in this way. Please read this for yourselves and decide what you think.
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on 1 December 2016
A must read of a less well known event.
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on 27 August 2015
After reviewing this book elsewhere, I was tweeted by a denier in Japan who claimed the appalling behaviour by Japanese troops in what was the former capital of China never took place, or if it did it was by Chiang Kai-Shek's Kuomintang army. That is what makes Iris Chang's well researched book important for all who are interested in the recent history of China and Japan.
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on 21 June 2017
An interesting and factual written book on a part of history long forgotten,but not hidden , and brought to the attention of the general public for those who are not aware how depraved in times of war can bring the worst in people to the forfront
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on 22 July 2015
Very arrowing account of what happened in Nanking, gives you an insight into the Japanese soldier mind at the time
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on 9 April 2017
A very sad book, but a very important book. Amazed at how few knew of the horror and how certain folks got away Scot free despite the horror they inflicted on others..but all for the greater greed!!
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on 4 August 2017
An excellent but a very harrowing book.
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on 26 June 2017
Heavy book :(
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on 29 April 2017
Jordan Peterson recommended this to me. Brought home territory into perspecive if you ask me, cos I'm German, and I accept the holocaust, but I didn't accept this until I read this book.
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on 28 August 2014
In a century with little shortage of barbaric acts the rape on Nanking is distinguished by its savagery. Iris Chang's admirable book seeks to rescue the historical record from Japanese obfuscation and our own collective amnesia by documenting the assault of 1937/38, in which an estimated 300,000 Chinese lost their lives, in all its stomach churning horror.

The book is not simply a catalogue of atrocities, although the baroque tortures visited on the people of Nanking are not spared the reader. It seeks to understand the socio-cultural factors which may have led to the Japanes commiting such atrocities. It also catalogues the rare acts of heroism such as that of John Rabe, a Nazi official living in the city who rescued thousands of people from rape and murder.

Importantly, Chang highlights that through mendacious scholarship, official denial of cultural figures and academics and successive governements, the Japnese have not in any way satisfactorily came to terms with the atrocities commited in their war against the Chinese, instead seemingly absolving themselves of any blame for historic wrongs.

As I write the Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe has reportedly paid tribute, at a buddhist shrine, to 1000 convicted Japanese war criminals ( "martyrs"), quoted a saying "I humbly express my deepest sympathy for the martyrs who sacrificed their souls to become the foundation of peace and prosperity in Japan today". I can think of no better illustration of why this book continues to be necessary
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