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Customer reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
10
4.5 out of 5 stars


on 16 June 2017
A great classic nicely presented. My second copy as my original paperback fell apart so definitely worth paying extra for this hardback edition. Speedy delivery. All in all book and seller thoroughly recommended
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on 21 July 2017
An old copy, as described, but so good to obtain this book. Well packed and arrived quickly.
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on 8 December 2011
When Grigson's book first appeared in 1957 a friend, an American biologist, was rather scornful of its scholarship. However I have owned various copies of the book since then and still find it the book about flowers I constantly turn to for information. Like Wikipedia it may have errors, but it remains the best and I have not found anyone else to approach Grigson's work let alone surpass it. It is in any case primarilly a literary record of background information, never intended as botanical science. Each plant has a list, often a long list, of local names with notes on its history and its place in the flora of Britain. I totally recommend it as a delight to own and to turn to, whether to check a reference or just to browse. Like Lousley's Wild Flowers of Chalk and Limestone in the New Naturalist series, and the more recent M M Mahood's The Poet as Botanist, it is written with dedicated enthusiam for the subject and an awareness the place wild flowers have in human history and culture, apart from the pleasure of seeing them and being able to identify them. WILD FLOWERS OF CHALK AND LIMESTONE. (NEW NATURALIST No 32).The Poet as Botanist
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 27 January 2011
First published in 1958, The Englishman's Flora collects common names, folklore, rhymes, literary references and snips from old herbals about a huge range of British native and naturalised plants. And I say "British" because, despite the title, Grigson strays over the border and, indeed, across the sea to Ireland. Most of the entries are English, though. The plants are arranged botanically, but there is, of course, a huge index giving every common name.

This book covers much of the same ground as Flora Britannica, although there are no photos here. The detail is different, and at the same time both more concise and more scholarly. I'm sure Mabey knew, and was inspired by Grigson's book. Why have this, then, when you could have Mabey's colour photos? Well, the contents aren't totally superceded by Mabey and Grigson is easier to refer to. I have both, and wouldn't part with either. Grigson was, I believe, the husband of Jane and father of Sophie, by the way, and his field was literature rather than biology.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 20 November 2012
First published in 1958, The Englishman's Flora collects common names, folklore, rhymes, literary references and snips from old herbals about a huge range of British native and naturalised plants. And I say "British" because, despite the title, Grigson strays over the border and, indeed, across the sea to Ireland. Most of the entries are English, though. The plants are arranged botanically, but there is, of course, a huge index giving every common name.

This book covers much of the same ground as Flora Britannica, although there are no photos here. The detail is different, and at the same time both more concise and more scholarly. I'm sure Mabey knew, and was inspired by Grigson's book. Why have this, then, when you could have Mabey's colour photos? Well, the contents aren't totally superceded by Mabey and Grigson is easier to refer to. I have both, and wouldn't part with either. Grigson was, I believe, the husband of Jane and father of Sophie, by the way, and his field was literature rather than biology.
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on 30 September 2014
Heavy going, but a great read. Like most of this type, it's a reference rather than a bedtime read.
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on 17 December 2015
Brilliant this book. Brilliant the service that delivered it.
Thanks!
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on 2 December 2016
Excellent listing of local British names
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on 9 June 2015
Full of bits and pieces of information about our native flowers.
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on 11 November 2015
Not read it properly but is good so far
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