Learn more Download now Browse your favorite restaurants Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more



on 20 August 2017
I read this in 1972, and had already partly lived it, mostly in London and on my travels. He was right about police of that time. Though the characters were my age and I was part of the hippie scene, I didn't like three of the main characters then and I feel the same today as I read it again. My impression is that Michener didn't really have a clue about young people of that time, hippies or not, and I consider parts of it to be rather misogynistic and naive wishful thinking. But then, he was much older than those he was trying to write about. However, he was spot on about the hard-line islamification of Africans - way ahead of his time there.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 September 2015
This is the quintessential fictional account of the "summer of love", centred mostly in Torremolinos in July 1969 (I, in my mid-twenties at that time was touring Europe, and I didn't go there despite advice from friends - I'm still kicking myself). The characters come from varied backgrounds and countries, one is a draft-dodger, another a fugitive from the law. The attitudes of the youth of that period are detailed, the music, sex, drug culture, the counter-culture (the anarchistic movement which called itself The Weathermen is portrayed as The Haymakers). The book examines the background to the six-day war in the Middle East by means of fictional account, and there are some telling quotations at the start of each chapter which it is well to read in the light of present-day political taboos and restrictions on free expression. The South African situation at the time is also examined as the characters visit Mozambique and meet some Afrikaner Nationalists.
This is a work of stature. Not a factual history, maybe, but perhaps a better account of the era and its perspectives than might be found in a history book. If you want to understand Western youth of that time, read it.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 12 November 2014
I first read The Drifters in 1973 whilst living and working in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. It is very much a book of its time - a Michener Classic. I re-read last year and it continues to evoke the late 1960s/early 1970s for me. Michener was a first class story teller and although his style maybe a little dated for many of today's modern readers, it describes so well the times in which we were living in Europe way back then. The characters are so well drawn that on re-reading the book, I felt I could stretch out my hand and touch each and everyone of the young people wondering if those who were still alive at the end of the book are still living today, and what did they make of their remaining lives.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 23 May 2016
Everyone knows this is a classic novel. But nobody has mentioned that the 2015 Dial Press edition is missing pages 79-110. It's definitely not intentional experimentation (a la Sterne), and there is no foreword or note about the omission (hardly the Dead Sea Scrolls is it).

So what happened? Was I unlucky? I doubt it. Another malfunction of the loveless mass-production that typifies prevailing business acumen surrounding art in modernity. Buy a different edition and cross your fingers.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 8 July 2013
one book you should read in your life is this one, won a plethora of awards in its day and although it is about the 60s the text is still pertinent to today's life.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 20 January 2016
This is a great novel. I read it when it in the early seventies, when the book was published. It may appear a bit outdated out-dated now and the language speaks of the sixties but it is still as powerful now as it was then. The book speaks of freedom, free will to choose and of youth. An excellent read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 16 August 2017
It was as if I travelled with them, a perfect description of Torremolinos of the late 60s.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 23 November 2014
It might be old but it's still relevant. A great read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 5 June 2016
Item was as described.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 26 March 2015
GOOD.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Customers also viewed these items

Centennial
£11.99
Caravans
£9.68
Journey
£11.29
Chesapeake
£15.99

Need customer service? Click here