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on 7 June 2009
A must for those who wish to be properly and unbiasedly informed about the very complex and difficult situtation in the Middle East. A great document, easy to understand, by a great historian!
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on 26 July 2010
Sir Martin Gilbert gives a historical overview in map form of the Israeli-Arab conflict, an update of the Third edition produced in 1979.

Gilbert, who is Jewish,is widely recognised as one of the leading historians of this generation.
This book is factual and shows how the odds have always been stacked against the Jewish people in their efforts to recover their land.
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on 8 August 2006
I am no expert on the topic of this book but I have three things I'd like to say which others may find helpful.

1. Notice the first two reviews are written by someone answering to the name D. Roberts. Maybe these are the same person and he is a friend of the author. Notice how the second reads like publisher's blurb. If my suspicions are correct, and I've noticed this before on Amazon, perhaps it would be a good idea for authors and publishers to stop wasting our time with this.

2. This book is hardly balanced. At one point, when the UN proposes its 1948 borders, the Jews are a persecuted minority of untrained farmer-soldiers facing the combined forces of the entire arab world attempting to drive them into the sea. Despite this, they manage not only to fend off these overwhelming forces but to win territory even beyond what they were defending. I wondered for a long time how that made sense. I'm still wondering.

3. I noticed a pattern of personalizing the Jewish victims of Arab attacks while leaving the attacks on Palestinians bare. So, for example, a Jew will be killed while bringing in the hay or whatever, while a Palestinian will simply be killed. This is not consistent with objectivity and balance.

In conclusion, this is worth reading for me as a novice because it is map-based and I am hoping to find a broad outline of the main events so that I can go on and discover elsewhere all the details tendentiously omitted from this slim volume. My hunch is this is a standard pro-zionist account against which other accounts can be compared for a true balance.
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on 12 April 2013
This is an important book in the Routledge Atlas series. It is not a book you can just sit down and read. It goes into great detail. It looks into oil supplies (pp 85,86), arms supplies (p 123.), refugees and the tortuous attempts to arrive at peace down to
November 2011.
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on 17 December 2012
Recommended but there are other publications which delve into the reasons behind the conflict. If you are simply looking for a chronology, this is it.
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on 18 November 2015
I find it shocking that Routledge would put its name on such a blatantly biased and offensive book. The author does not even make an attempt to mask the clear pro-Israeli bias. Suffice to say that there is not a single map showing Israeli attacks on Palestinian civilians! As a matter of fact, there is no mention of Palestinians to begin with, they are referred to as "Arabs".

Still, the book does serve a few purposes. First, it is an illustration of the power of maps in narrating a story and a testament to how even supposedly factual maps can be extremely misleading. More importantly, it is a documentation of the historical British (and Western) narrative of the Israeli-Arab conflict, one which has thankfully been replaced in the past decade by a more factual and objective narrative by Israeli, Palestinian, and international scholars alike.

If you are interested in learning about the history of the creation of the state of Israel and the Israeli-Arab conflict, I would suggest reading the works of Ilan Pappe, Benny Morris, and Ben White.
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on 3 August 2005
I bought this book to compliment other books that i have read on the conflict mainly for reference as although they had maps in them I wanted to have more detail. This atlas has been very helpful for me on this enabling me to understand the conflict better especially the land issues which are very complex. Finding books that do not distort the truth one way or another is difficult on this issue and this is one of them. Another I recommend is, "Myths and Facts" or, "Holy land Holy War"
I am not a student but I should think this is poplular with them for a balanced view from both sides as I can't see it being biased one way or another.
I have found this to be a value for money, good all round atlas on this topic and recommend it highly.
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on 4 June 2014
The book my be brilliant but it is unsuitable for easy use on a Kindle. I purchased, returned within minutes and am about to buy a hard copy of the same. I must emphasise my comments simply related to the Kindle Editions, not the book itself. ( I must also add that the Amazon Customer Service team were brilliant in their dealing with me about this ).
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VINE VOICEon 20 November 2003
A priceless study and reference to the 'age-old' Arab-Israeli conflict by Sir Martin Gilbert, a renown expert on the subject.
The whole history of the Arab-Jewish conflict is traced in detail, especially from the turn of the 20th Century right through to the recent so-called 'peace process'.
Approximately 150 detailed maps are provided, depicting wars, violence, political 'agreements', negotiations and cease-fires, all together with their dates and context.
Of particular note are the maps surrounding the 'plans' for Palestine surrounding the Balfour Declaration of 1917, maps outlining the land promised to the Jews through British pledges for the provision of a Jewish homeland and the subsequent 'border changes' due to large areas of this impending Jewish land being 'ceded' for the creation of the Arab state of Transjordan.
Some very useful maps are even provided dated 1,000BC to 636AD pertaining to the Jewish presence in 'Palestine' before the Arab conquest. The Jewish presence is also documented in 'Palestine' from the Arab conquest of 636AD to 1914 and onwards.
Comprising some 180 pages, this is a must-have reference for any serious student in this subject. These historic maps can only be a thorn in the side of the 'new-historians' who seek to de-Judaize the Promised Land. Highly recommended.
Another recommended work by Sir Martin Gilbert is "Exile And Return; The Struggle For A Homeland".
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on 25 November 2014
As a postgraduate student of the Arab-Israeli conflict, if you're looking for a book that portrays impartial maps to help illustrate the story of the Arab-Israeli conflict, this is certainly not the book for you. It is written and presented in a manner so heinously biased towards the Israelis as to make a mockery of its title.

The first 50 pages, for example, fails categorically to construct a fair two-sided approach to the conflict and instead focuses solely on Palestinian atrocities (though of course the Palestinians don't exist to Gilbert who only refers to them as the Arabs) and around building a case of why Jews deserved to take the land of Palestine. This would be fine if of course the Zionists did not commit similar atrocities towards the Palestinians - which they did in the droves - and if of course he attempted to show, even remotely, why the Palestinians were angry with Jewish settlers travelling to Israel. Instead Gilbert comes across as ignorant, one-sided and quite frankly dangerous as he distorts truth into building a polemical excuse for the creation of Israel, slotting neatly into 'lets only tell half the story' school of historical thought.

This isn't surprising considering Gilbert is a committed Zionist, but the fact that Routledge continues to publish this rubbish is quite disturbing. To conclude then, if you do want a book that omits, at the minimum, half the facts, that seeks to apologise for and excuse ethnic cleansing, or are yourself a committed Zionist and want to feel rosy and warm about your history, this is the book for you.
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