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on 23 June 2014
This is a gem of a play which has a poetry all of its own. It also has a fascinating heritage, based on the dilemma of whether you should resist (the Nazis) even if such acts could lead to the deaths of family and friends. It a subject considered by Simone de Beauvoir in the Le Sang des Autres. This volume is well laid out and a must for any Francophile.
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on 7 November 2015
Already proving very stimulating to a student who is primarily discovering the Sophocles original and hadn't before now known of the Anouilh. For me it brought back memories of playing Creon thirty-five years ago in an amateur production. His speech about how someone had to take over the reins in ruined Thebes sounded remarkably like Mrs Thatcher before her election......
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on 12 December 2014
very french
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on 18 March 2015
Good
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on 24 September 2016
Haven't finished reading it but it came in a nice package with a bookmark
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on 5 December 2011
It's a great play, as other people have said, but does anyone else agree that the translation looks dodgy? For a start, sometimes it loses specificity for no reason that was clear to me. 'Le rideau s'est leve' becomes 'the play started'. 'Ce soir' becomes 'in a few hours' time.' An iron spade becomes a tin one for no reason I could fathom. Shooting 'dans le tas'- into the crowd - is 'the first comer.' 'Dans un trou', with its ironic foreshadowing, becomes 'locked up in the dark' There's often an unnecessary wordiness, compared with Anouilh's precise, terse prose. 'Ou alors je refuse' becomes the mealy and cliched, 'or else I decline the offer, lock, stock and barrel.' And some translations simply look wrong. Nourrice/ nounou gets translated as the lower-class 'Nan' (meaning 'Grandmother') rather than 'Nanny' (Antigone is a princess, of course). The guards speak a bizarre fake-demotic of 'chap' and 'blotto.' And on p59 a whole speech by Creon about Eurydice is missed out, so that we never learn what he thinks of his wife.
The greatest shame is the disappearance of the repetitions of key words that Anouilh uses for his subtle and ironic effects. The three 'voilas' from the Chorus, at the start, middle and end of the play disappear. The guard - called 'une brute' by stage directions becomes 'a rough diamond.' This is not just an unwarranted softening of nastiness. It also loses the way the authorial judgements echo Creon's, who also uses the word 'brute' of the guard (translated 'louts') and of the whole populace (mildly translated 'clods'). Anouilh's hints of brother-sister incest through the word 'voyou' are also swept under the carpet. Used of Polynices it becomes 'good-for-nothing'; of Antigone's suspected lover 'young layabout'; of her young admirers 'the boys'; and of the two brothers 'gangsters'. As for the repeated word 'tranquille', used ironically of order under Nazism, it gets fudged so the whole point'll be completely missed.
There's plenty more in this vein. But the alternative, older Galantiere translation isn't that great either. Can anyone recommend a decent one?
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on 26 March 2002
This is a very good English version of Jean Anouilh's Antigone. It includes notes and a commentary, which are very helpful, especially if you are studying this text. The translation stays true to the original text, so again, it is useful if you are studying it.
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on 14 June 2013
great, though would have been better to have the english translation and french script as part of the same book.
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on 10 August 2014
Part of a Masters set book list. An interesting read but I haven't read the original yet so can't say how it compares.
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on 14 February 2011
Very quick and efficient service for an independent seller, book arrived in environmentally friendly packaging and in very good condition as stated. Will certainly look to use you again in the future.
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