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on 21 February 2015
Whilst I cannot agree with everything Karima Bennoune writes about in this book, it certainly made me think. My husband is Algerian and he certainly wouldn't agree with everything in this book. Yet Algeria seems to have found a middle ground. Polygamy is accepted there though not common. Muslims and Christians live happily together. Some Muslims cover, some don't. Nothing is forced.
I am a practising Muslim. I don't drink, I eat halal, I pray 5 times a day, I fast, I do all my pillars and hope one day to do my Haj God willing. However, if you ask me do I want Sharia law in my country, the answer would be no every time. That does not mean I am not Muslim, nor does it mean that I do not follow Allah.
It does mean that I follow what is written in the Quran, not what men think that is required of us. Where in the Quran does it say stone someone for adultery? It doesn't, so I have to ask why not? So why would I want a law that would apply that?
“There is no compulsion in religion. Verily, the Right Path has become distinct from the wrong path” [al-Baqrah 2:256]

I believe Islam is clear. The Quran is clear. Yet I also believe along the way man has (once again) tried to change/add things for his own benefit. Not to the Quran no, but some hadeeth yes.
I am not alone in this belief though many are afraid to speak out for fear of being told they are not true followers etc.
I do not believe that any woman should be physically forced to cover her hair by a man. That should be her choice and hers alone.
I do not believe there should be ' Mutaween' (religious police). If you are following rules because you have no choice that is not faith.
I am sure with my next statement some Muslims will think I have no idea about Islam but I want to say why is it men are allowed to wear attar (perfume) going to mosque but women aren't? Surely women will look at the men just as men would look at the women?
If other Muslims want to believe this that is fine by me, but don't force me to pretend I believe it.
I love Islam, I love being a Muslim but no one can force Eeman (faith) on anyone.
No one has a right to say who is or isn't Muslim just by the way they dress. Or if they listen to music or not.
Islam gave women their rights back, don't let men take them away again.
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on 9 May 2014
This is an amazing, courageous book, written by someone with experience of how Islamic fundamentalists affect everyday life. In turn, it made me sad and angry. It is a sign of hope that people are prepared to resist the terrorism inflicted on their communities but their stories need to be more widely known and acknowledged, especially internationally. All too often, it seems they are ignored, even by well-known humanitarian organisations. This book gives resisters the credit they so richly deserve.
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on 18 November 2014
A harrowing and vital book. The Muslim world is plagued by deranged theocatic thugs who inhabit the same moral sewer as the Nazis. I was humbled by the bravery of people who stand up to the scum forcing them into a new Dark Age, angered at how people can behave like this and my contempt for the smug hypocrisy of the Western left-liberal multiculturalists reached new heights. Where is the support from Western women's groups or human rights organisations? If we really believe in universal human rights, equality for women and religious and sexual minorities, free enquiry and rejection of brutal superstition then we should say so unequivocally. Or are rights and progress only for people in the West?
The author is absolutely right in that our focus on terrorists and their attacks on the West, we forget those who face these monsters every day.
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on 8 June 2015
This is such a beautiful read and a much needed narrative that is missing in Britain; the stories will give you a new perspective on Islamic fundamentalism.
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on 27 May 2014
I wish i can get this book for people like Abubakar Shekau, and his type using religion as an excuse to commit atrocities.
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on 30 October 2014
Should be mandantory reading, especially across the Western world. Brilliant.
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on 24 July 2016
In the West we have to demand more of our governments, and we have to help the countless struggling, vulnerable Muslims who want to live in peaceful, functioning societies without extremists threatening them. This important survey of Muslims standing up for human rights and dignity is a vital part of our armoury.
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