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on 28 July 2014
This book is so so so brilliant - Only God knows why I hadn't read it earlier. Have even ordered copies for friends! An excellent book.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 28 September 2007
Futurism is fun! Alvin and Heidi Toffler have been proving that for a long time as they informed us about Future Shock (the accelerating pace of life) and The Third Wave (knowledge-driven economies). The essence of the task is to take straws in the wind and project them forward to ask "what if?" thus and so were to accelerate. As a result, the use of such thinking is to inspire us . . . rather than precisely project the future. Entrepreneurs will take some of these insights and create trillion dollar industries. Will you be one of them? Perhaps not, unless you read the book.

For most people, the book will be a wake-up call in a number of areas. If you regularly read about emerging trends . . . especially in technology, globalization, and finance, you won't find that much new here in terms of trends. You will find interesting perspectives on those trends that may differ from what you've read before.

If you don't have the luxury to immerse yourself in trends, this book will be a revelation that you'll enjoy.

For me, the new perspectives in the book came in the following areas:

1. Globalization in terms of economic intertwining is not inevitably destined to increase. In fact, many trends point to the possibility of a reversal of increasing globalization at some future point. That was an interesting thought to consider which has large investing consequences.

2. Economic statistics are falling further and further behind in measuring what's really going on in production and consumption . . . particularly as people produce and consume more for themselves. A lot of our economic surprises probably relate to changes in what isn't being measured.

3. Emerging market countries are increasingly trying to compete at the cutting edge of the most advanced knowledge-based industries like nanotechnology and biotechnology rather than being satisfied to provide low-cost labor and other physical resources.

4. Poverty is more likely to be eased through sharing knowledge resources inexpensively with the poor so they can improve their own lot than by doing more for the poor in a physical sense (the traditional aid approach).

You'll probably take different food for thought from the book. Rich in examples and optimism, you'll find plenty to stimulate your mind and your conversations for months to come.

To me, the book would have been stronger if the Tofflers had tried to forge ahead further into the implications of current trends. They usually just inched a few years ahead in looking at issues and potential.
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on 24 July 2008
We are on the edge of an amazing future. What changes lay ahead? What skills will you need to be successful and happy? Will you be ready?

Alvin and Heidi Toffler are futurists. They have studied and written predictions of the future for decades.

Their first book, Future Shock was released back in 1970. It was thoroughly researched and critically thought through. Many of their predictions came true.

Revolutionary Wealth also makes predictions about the future. Since their past books were proven to be accurate on many topics, it's fair to assume that their latest book will provide many insightful thoughts about the future.

Here are just a few of the topics: Waves of wealth, the edge of knowledge, the gospel of change, implosion, capitalism's end game, running tomorrow's money and much more.

The book is a page turner and provides a peek into what can and probably will happen depending on the paths that we as society take.

Here are some key excerpts from their work.

The Wealth System

"If the First Wave wealth system was chiefly based on growing things, and the Second Wave on making things, the Third Wave wealth system is increasingly based on serving, thinking, knowing and experiencing...The new wealth system demands a complete shake-up in the way increasingly temporary skill sets are organized for increasingly temporary purposes throughout the economy. Nothing is more deeply fundamental to the creation of wealth."

Knowledge

"In each of us there is a crowded, invisible warehouse full of knowledge and its precursor data and information. But unlike a warehouse, it is also a workshop in which we--or, more accurately, the electrochemicals in our brains--continually shift, add, subtract, combine and rearrange numbers, symbols, words, images, and memories, combining them with emotions to form new thoughts."

Cross Disciplinary Knowledge Required

"More and more jobs require cross-disciplinary knowledge, so that we find increasing need for hyphenated backgrounds--"Astro-biologist," "bio-physicist," "environmental-engineer," "forensic-accountant.""

A New Dawn

"Living at the dawn of this century, we are direct or indirect participants in the design of a new civilization with a revolutionary wealth system at its core. Will this process complete itself--or will the still incomplete wealth revolution come to a crashing halt?" 1

The message is clear. Those who will succeed and prosper in the coming years will have the following skills and backgrounds:

* Decision making
* Knowledge
* Schooling
* Experience
* Reasoning
* Intuition
* Common sense
* Confidence

These skills and background can be boiled down to three words: Critical Thinking Skills. With these skills you will be prepared for whatever challenges the future presents.

As with his book Future Shock and other books he has written, Toffler has an amazing ability to look at the very beginning of trends and then extrapolate a future out of those trends. His predications come from interviews with many world experts. Toffler then uses his critical thinking skills to integrating everything he has learned. From this knowledge he constructs a vision of the future. Not only that, he provides options we should consider to create a positive future for ourselves.

Knowledge is power:
This is a must read book to gain a glance into what tomorrow brings! It can be positive if we take the right steps...there is hope!

The Re-Discovery of Common Sense: A Guide To: The Lost Art of Critical Thinking
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 10 November 2006
Futurism is fun! Alvin and Heidi Toffler have been proving that for a long time as they informed us about Future Shock (the accelerating pace of life) and The Third Wave (knowledge-driven economies). The essence of the task is to take straws in the wind and project them forward to ask "what if?" thus and so were to accelerate. As a result, the use of such thinking is to inspire us . . . rather than precisely project the future. Entrepreneurs will take some of these insights and create trillion dollar industries. Will you be one of them? Perhaps not, unless you read the book.

For most people, the book will be a wake-up call in a number of areas. If you regularly read about emerging trends . . . especially in technology, globalization, and finance, you won't find that much new here in terms of trends. You will find interesting perspectives on those trends that may differ from what you've read before.

If you don't have the luxury to immerse yourself in trends, this book will be a revelation that you'll enjoy.

For me, the new perspectives in the book came in the following areas:

1. Globalization in terms of economic intertwining is not inevitably destined to increase. In fact, many trends point to the possibility of a reversal of increasing globalization at some future point. That was an interesting thought to consider which has large investing consequences.

2. Economic statistics are falling further and further behind in measuring what's really going on in production and consumption . . . particularly as people produce and consume more for themselves. A lot of our economic surprises probably relate to changes in what isn't being measured.

3. Emerging market countries are increasingly trying to compete at the cutting edge of the most advanced knowledge-based industries like nanotechnology and biotechnology rather than being satisfied to provide low-cost labor and other physical resources.

4. Poverty is more likely to be eased through sharing knowledge resources inexpensively with the poor so they can improve their own lot than by doing more for the poor in a physical sense (the traditional aid approach).

You'll probably take different food for thought from the book. Rich in examples and optimism, you'll find plenty to stimulate your mind and your conversations for months to come.

To me, the book would have been stronger if the Tofflers had tried to forge ahead further into the implications of current trends. They usually just inched a few years ahead in looking at issues and potential.
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on 19 January 2015
I received this book from a colleague and I'm glad I did. It gives a great insight (even though a few years out of date now) into Wealth, how it is created, where it is created and a clear explanation of globalisation; how we are shifting from industry to a knowledge based system. It is written very clearly and unlike most books in the "economics" space, it doesn't use technical jargon just for the sake of it. The Toffler's come across as well travelled, educated and experienced with a valuable insight that you want to listen to. The focus is on America (i.e. industry, services, NGOs, education etc.) however they speak intelligently about all the major (and currently not major) global powers and I could recognise and translate what they were saying into the UK system. My only criticism and why I give this 4 not 5 stars was due to the fact they don't spend enough time discussing the effect of religion and war on wealth (as an Atheist my thinking was on the detrimental and diversionary aspects but I'm sure an Apologist would counter-argument that one) which could have been just a single chapter but important for balance. All in all very good book, easy to read and difficult to put down!
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on 15 October 2009
The revolutionary wealth comes from the knowledge economy that is the third wave of man's economic development, following the agricultural and industrial waves. Being based on knowledge rather than consumable resources the knowledge wealth is available to all and almost inexhaustible. At least that is the authors' thesis. There is an interesting discussion of prosumerism - a sophisticated term for DIY - where a product is produced by the consumer. There are many, indeed too many, examples. Why do such books have to be four times longer than necessary. The length smothers the importance of its message.
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on 26 November 2012
great book as always from the Tofflers they really have good thoughts on society as we should see it today
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on 24 November 2014
Very interesting book
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on 22 February 2016
Fantastic, thank you!
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