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on 26 July 2017
Quite thought-provoking. The book offers several real-world examples of situations where different companies and organisations found "tipping points" in their business or activities, and these examples are very well analysed and explained. The book is quite comprehensive in terms of analysing "tipping points" that have happened, and the elements that create these "tipping points".

The one downside to the book is that it doesn't quite manage to tie everything together into giving advice about how to create a "tipping point" for your own business. It all seems to boil down to "know the right people", and "do the right thing at the right time". It can explain very well why "tipping points" have happened, but it doesn't explain so well how to create a "tipping point" for your own organisation or activities. If this is the kind of advice you are looking for, then the book is not going to achieve your goals completely. However, I must reiterate that it gives superb explanations of "tipping points" that have happened, these analyses are very thought provoking, and you could certainly take many of the lessons and ideas and try to apply them to your own business.
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on 19 February 2017
I had recently read the 'Outliers' by Gladwell and enjoyed it; with such books you need to have the right approach; that is to have an open mind and not expect empirical-based conclusions, but rather be prepared to read and enjoy amusing and thought-provoking correlations and observations from selective situations. This book however stunned me. It was written around 7-8 years before the 'Outliers' and you could easily tell how Gladwell's maturity had evolved in that period. This book is so repetitive in its themes, redundant in asserting its conclusions and simply boring in its overall flow. While I found many of the examples amusing in the 'Outliers', here they lacked originality and intrigue. What struck me initially was how Gladwell had provided a totally different explanation as to why crime fell in NYC in this book, than to what he later mentioned in the Outliers. Why the dramatic change of opinion? I will not go in much details so as not to spoil this for those who are yet to read his books. His example on the success of Sesame Street was so protracted and based on the unique discipline of child psychology that I am not sure how transferable the conclusion here was to his overrriding theories. His conclusions on teenage smoking can be easily refuted based on recent studies (remember the book was written around 15 years ago). And lastly, I was so dumbfounded by his observations on suicides in Micronesia that I decided to test the study myself. He mentions a suicide rate of 170 per 100,000 and concludes how it was one of the highest in the world. I checked for myself that in that period of time the entire population of Micronesia was around 70,000 and so the actual statistical population was so small and there were so many isolated cases that he had already mentioned that any statistician would yield their results as unacceptable (in light of the small statistical population) and in need of adjustment. Having said all that, his theory on the tipping point is not unfounded and could have better been presented in a long new yorker-style article, rather than a protracted book filled with either dubious or naive examples.
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on 11 September 2016
I'm not really in a position to review this book yet as I'm still not half way through. I'm finding it a bit hard work, painful even, a bit American, but I have watched a lot of the author's talks on Youtube, so this spoils it for me. So many references to American popular culture and to the American civil war. I find those very tedious, and the worshiping practically of successful business men, I can't relate to. He does it to illustrate a point, the tipping point, but, there's just something about the genre I'm not keen on. I'd rather he used climate change to illustrate the tipping point, because it's more relevant and important to everyone on earth, and not just Americans. Maybe he will later, as I said, I'm less than half way through, and struggling to find the impetus to carry on! (It might improve because I think he's a brilliant speaker and an original thinker, so I hate to be critical. but I can't stand this style of writing.)
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on 16 April 2015
Ever wondered what makes some messages stick? If you're involved in education, marketing, communication and management, you've probably had some aha-moments of your own.
If so, you have undoubtedly wished you could more often get those little ideas and small changes lead to big impact.
What does it take to make an idea or a message stick or go viral? How do you manage change effectively? Malcom takes you with him on a journey through the last 100 years of research in sociology and psychology and skilfully, at his own pace, assuages any doubts you may as to the conclusions he draws. This in no guess work. It’s meticulous research and it’s light years from a dry research paper written in isolation. It’s hard to put the book down because it’s so damn good to read about how simple (or great) people have made -knowingly or unknowingly so- simple ideas have such lasting impact.
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on 17 October 2012
I must confess that I came to this book very naively. I have never read a Gladwell book before but knew him to be oft quoted by other authors. I knew what a tipping point was and how great changes have gained momentum but didn't know what the book would be concentrating on because unusually I hadn't read any reviews of this book. I know people like to be clever and discuss what is wrong about the book and perhaps points and subjects he missed but the bibliography at the end shows a tremendous amount of acedemic research, including some very obscure pieces. I doubt his critics have read much of the background research. However, this is a very accessible and interesting piece that sets the reader thinking and sweeping aside their simplistic ideas of how the world works. I don't want to discuss detail too much because I hope that you will want to read or reread the book yourself. It is an enjoyable and thought provoking read and is also entertaining and fascinating. The Baltimore situation discussed early in the book identifies not one but three causes of a situation that combined together to become an epidemic. Another subject analysed about "the british are coming" analyses why one message got through and one message had little impact. The book brings together types of people such as "mavens" who knit together the process of change in society leading and shaping the path that the rest of us follow. The book is very similar and sometimes overlaps withSuperfreakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance which has a similar style of bringing complex ideas down to a level that we can digest, remember, discuss and be entertained by. I tend to buy books like I buy music. Whilst there may be something new that everybody is talking about and is in the shops, there is a massive back catologue of classics that stand the test of time.
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on 3 July 2014
It's one of the best books I ever read. I instantly became a Malcolm Gladwell fan after reading this book.
I like the way the author backs up his opinions with research data, studies references and generally things you can look into for yourself. So in case you find yourself particularly interested in a particular topic the book gives you a good starting point.
The stories even though apparently unrelated having their own conclusions and endings build up into a meta-story with it's own teachings.
You can simply pick up the book and start reading from the middle of the book and you'll still get something out of it.

Recommended for all those interested in the mechanics of human behaviour. I found it ...enlightening
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on 18 February 2015
this has already had lots of wideranging and laudatory feedback - and it's good, it's smart - i stopped reading about 3/4 of the way through because I got it, I got it - that's the only thing; it's v clever and insightful to a certain level. His notion of the tipping point has also certainly made its way into journalistic and popular sensibility. it's been said in other less 'flashy' ways, and while i think it's a good gloss on what looks like being a profound insight into paradigm shifts, etc it's just the trimmings, it seems to me. very readable and that's a boon!
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on 29 March 2010
In Malcolm Gladwell's book The Tipping Point, one of his four great books, he explains how ideas, products, behaviours suddenly become the way people think and do things, the items that become desirable, become the behaviours of society, spreading through a population like an epidemic.

He tells us how beliefs can change quickly, how one person can have more influence on change than another, giving specific examples to substantiate his ideas, for instance how Paul Revere got the American colonists around 1773 to become organised against the British, how the Airwalk footwear became fashion, how crime waves were reduced in New York City.

He explains that in any situation or market there will be four major influences.

There will be the "Market Mavens", people who passes vital information to others about their knowledge, perhaps about good prices, good deals.

There will be "Connectors", people who know people who know people. There is a theory, often called "the six degrees of separation", that says it only needs a chain of six people to get information from person A to person B, from yourself for example to the Queen of England.

The "Stickiness" factor, how a message or information will stay in the mind, say like a slogan, and advertisement, how something will become an "anchor" in NLP terms.

The forth is "Context", how ideas or products rely on the time and place change takes place, and the conditions and circumstances when they occur.

Using examples though-out, this book is easy to follow, a must for those in marketing and places of influence, and a must for those of us who are manipulated by others, by governments, by media, radio, TV and newspapers.

The book will open your eyes.
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on 7 January 2018
An interesting book, with one or two original ideas. But the general structure of the book is confusing; chapters are not edited correctly. May be it was a book with a "number of characters" contract . . . hence Malcolm had to write and write.

As a main rule, a good book need only one good character: its writer . . .
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on 20 August 2015
Read this after hearing all the hype and unfortunately, they hype has oversold it. Maybe it isn't a bad book, but the hype has really hurt it in my opinion. I found all the stories a bit trite, not particularly convincing or backed up with facts. It came across as a madman's rambling rather than a ground breaking piece of non-fiction. The writing style is over the top and full of rhetoric that would make a presidential campaign wince. I couldn't finish this book.
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