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TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 10 July 2017
The book is not an intellictual study, but an easy read that is simple and very very powerful. Its full of explanation and guidance on how we can better ourselves and make life better for others. It offers a new outlook to modern societies preoccupation with selfish advancement and judgement of others. Though it must be stressed that this book alone is just the guidance, the real work is with us all to meditate, understand and bring about compassion and warmth. You need not be religious or have an interest in Buddhism to get something from this book. My only criticism is that the author, Howard Cutler (a psychoanalyst), takes up too much of the book. If you want a book purely of the Dalai Lama then I would recommend "Ancient Wisdom, Modern Life". Its a much better book and much of what is in it is here in this book anyway.
19 people found this helpful
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on 10 August 2017
This book is one that I can honestly say has had the most impact on me as a person and my life, even a long time after first reading it. It really puts things into perspective, encouraging you to take a step back and realise that life is not about wealth and material items and that the only thing we really have is the present so to embrace it every single second. This book helps you to stop holding grudges, be more empathetic and understand that we're all just humans at the end of the day. A great read and this book really is for anyone, you just need to be willing to open your mind.
12 people found this helpful
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on 21 January 2017
For anyone who is looking for more joy and happiness in their life. Spirituality is presented in a really accessible way, you don't need to be a deep thinker to understand it. You will realise that true happiness doesn't rest on wealth or how you look, how much stuff you have. True happiness is a state of peace, compassion and love.
10 people found this helpful
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on 22 March 2017
Anything this man writes is worth its weight in gold
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on 17 February 2017
Contrast of Buddhist thought with western view of the world made the concepts in the book much more accessible to someone entirely new to buddhism.
7 people found this helpful
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on 22 June 2017
Great to think through some concepts. Written for the average reader so not too technical at all. Ideal for gaining a broad understanding of Dalai Lamas thinking.
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on 20 May 2018
Wonderful book. It raises the key question: how can we achieve inner contentment? There are two methods. One method is to obtain everything that we want and desire—all the money, houses, and cars; the perfect mate; and the perfect body. The Dalai Lama has already pointed out the disadvantage of this approach; if our wants and desires remain unchecked, sooner or later we will run up against something that we want but can’t have.
The second, and more reliable, method is not to have what we want but rather to want and appreciate what we have
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on 5 June 2014
I admire the Dalai Lama and wanted to read more about him .... being a practicing Buddhist myself ... he was asked at one point does he have any regrets? Yes was the answer and he proceeded to talk about a elder monk , with probably more experience than himself , who had come to him and who had asked him to teach him a particular teaching or method .. no doubt for attaining buddhahood ... I can't remember the exact details ... you will have to read it !.... but he told him that it was something that you usually had to start learning at young age as it takes a long time to learn and perfect... and so the monk went a way and committed suicide in the hopes of coming back to learn this particular teaching from the Dalai Lama from a young age .... the buddhist teaching I practice teaches that all we have to do is chant Nam myoho renge kyo ... and the chanting of this phrase. the essence of the Lotus Sutra... enables an ordinary mortal ... male or female in that instant to manifest their innate Buddhahood ... courage. compassion . wisdom and life force .... and through the constant practice .. to change their life at a deep level ...Reading this book reconfirmed once again why I practice Nichiren Buddhism.
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on 16 July 2014
It takes the good part of Buddhism which people can benefit from. But before I discuss this, Buddhism is far from perfect. You're not allowed to be ordained if you're gay, transgender (although some still slip through) and it pushes an idea of purity and abstinence in order to be like the perfect being. The prejudice Buddhists hold against other Buddhists is proof that religion is not the answer and that Buddhism is not inherently good as it still spreads ignorance and doesn't prevent all intolerance. This book is good PR for Buddhism, just realize that it doesn't need religion and the rules of it for it to work.

Now, compassion is great, altruism is a vital part of the human survival which seems to be fading in modern day. Being able to understand other people's feelings is important. I truly wish every person could read this book and become a better human. There was one part though, which I ignored for the Dalai Lama and psychologist know not of what religion is capable of and how spirituality does not need be with religion, thus I encourage you to ignore the last chapter in its entirety.
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on 14 May 2018
A very engaging book that I found to be great to read in small chunks, giving you time to mull over what you'd just read, and being in a conversational style, was easy for my small brain to grasp. The basic premise is.....just be kind, listen to people, don't judge, and don't become angry when people are being awful to you.....be compassionate, as they're only lashing out because they're angry at themselves. A great reminder of how we should all be living. I do have to say though, that the book ends very strangely. After being a completely non-religious book throughout (and I'm actually convinced that the Dalai Lama is actually agnostic), the author seems to suddenly project his own apparent Christian beliefs upon the reader when there has been no evidence of it up to that point. It just seems absolutely out of place within the book and left me feeling strangely disorientated by the author's sudden indiscriminate pronouncements.
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