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  • Credo
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4.0 out of 5 stars
47
4.0 out of 5 stars
Credo
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£9.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 31 July 2017
It was as described, all the pages are there and perfectly readable!
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on 5 March 2017
As expected and prompt delivery
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on 25 September 2016
I loved Melvyn Bragg's 'The Adventure of English' and looked forward to reading his fiction. Unfortunately, the head-hopping from the point of view of one character to another made the book difficult to follow and stopped me as a reader identifying or caring for any particular character. Then there was the problem of the lack of action. We learn about Brega's arranged marriage in the first few pages -- and by page 100 we still haven't reached the ceremony. The description is excellent and reveals the extent of the author's research but it is over-done, particularly the description of minor minor (the repetition is deliberate) characters and bogs down the book which desperately needed a strong editorial red pen. I finally abandoned it at page 250 when the ceaseless head-hopping between the pov's of the Christian fanatics left me utterly confused.
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on 17 January 2017
It has taken me four weeks to get through this time! Not since struggling through Hilary Mantel's turgid and confusing Wolf Hall have I had so much difficulty reading one book! There are some gripping passages and the insights into the conflict between Celtic and Roman Christianity have a lot of merit. However, these are lost in an annoying "will they, won't they" scenario with little to inspire in the relationship between Began and Padrig. I wonder what authors like Bernard Cornwell might have made of this story? Shorter, more exciting and passionate for sure. Not the worst read I have ever had - but close!
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on 29 October 2013
BOUGHT FOR SOME ONE ELSE HE STARTED TO READ IT AND THEN LEFT IT ON THE TRAIN THATS WHY HE BOUGHT A SECOND HAND ONE
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on 16 April 2007
Credo tells the story of a young Irish princess named Bega, and the two loves of her life - her God and a young nobleman called Padric - a lifelong tug between this earth and the next, romance and faith. The story is set in seventh century Britain, and Melvyn Bragg has really done his homework, describing life in Anglo Saxon times in rich detail. Many of the characters are based on historical figures too, St Bega being the main one, and the story hinges around real events. I personally found it very convincing, and a real insight into a particular place and culture, the Kingdom of Northumbria and Celtic Christianity.

It's quite a fascinating period in English history, and an important one in the story of Christianity, and Credo hits a satisfying balance between love story, adventure, and historical exploration. These were savage times, and Bragg doesn't gloss over the brutality. He doesn't dwell on it either, but sensitive readers should be warned that there are some genuinely horrible moments. My only real caution though is the length - at some 780 pages it takes some commitment to reach the end. But if you're a fan of epic novels and are willing to take your time, its a rewarding read.
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on 17 October 2013
I first read Credo a few years ago, and absolutely loved it. Have long ago lost my original copy, to I decided to buy another one from Amazon, paperback. Unfortunately, the book, when it came, was unreadable due to the tiny writing. (What with my eyes not being what they were). So I ordered a hard-back copy, which is considerably bigger and oh so much better. It's not an ordeal at all to read it.

So, if you're thinking of buying this novel, if size matters to you, please do yourself a favour and buy the hardback. It's more expensive, but for all the time you're going to be investing in it (it's eight-hundred pages long!)well worth it.
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on 18 July 2014
OK
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on 4 May 2012
awful, heavyweight, overlong, contrived story with long and gory tales of rape & pillage and some inconsistent historical points. Glad I bought it for only 1penny from Amazon!
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on 21 February 2014
This is a really good novel.
Bragg has thought his way into a mysterious period of eraly English history and the result is compelling and satisfying.
He is a fine writer.
My only observation is that it is a bit too long. I didn't get bored because he held my attention but he could have shortened to about 500 pages without losing anything.
He clearly loves this period dearly.
I can see from this novel why.
Five stars stuff.
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