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Customer reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
11

on 10 March 2013
this is a very funny well written parody of a famous Jane Austen book. i read it years ago and have been trying to find a copy ever since, it's good it is now on the kindle- Viv
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on 16 February 2015
great read
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on 15 June 2000
This book stands well enough on its own wit and sheer exuberance even if you don't catch any of the sly references to "Pride and Prejudice." I was already fully enjoying the core story of a TV crew's disrupting influence on a bucolic village before something in the pub dance scene struck a chord of recognition. It sounds as if some of the previous reviewers got a bit hung up looking for parallels when the book was offering surprises. Certainly the early chapters, which lulled this New Yorker into a sentimental longing for the Yorkshire countryside, left me quite unprepared for the breathless page-turners in the latter half. I haven't read such well-sustained suspense since Jack Finney's multi-chapter chase scene in "Time and Again."
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on 21 October 2001
I loved this book. As I love "Pride and Prejudice" I was slighlty wary of reading this book. It was soon abudently clear that I wouldn't have to worry on that account, The role reversal of the characters was brilliant and making the connections with Austen was just downright fun. I read it very quickly because I just couldn't stop myself.
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on 6 February 2001
If you love Pride and Prejudice, here's one of the most clever send ups I've read. The genders are reversed - but Kate Fenton goes further, twisting the plot more. Is it Jane Austen? No - but there was only one Jane Austen. This is fun..
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on 2 May 1999
This is one of the most delicious books I've read in years. A modern version of Pride and Prejudice, Lions and Liquorice turns Austen's demure maidens into a pair of North Yorkshire males whose lives are turned upside down when a production of Pride and Prejudice shows up in the village for filming. In this version, it's the women who are rich, famous and successful, starting with the Darcy figure, who is the 'tall, dark, and arrogantly handsome woman director.' The chief character, Nicholas Llewellyn Bevan, is a local writer whose reviews are better than his income, and who, like Elizabeth Bennett, finds himself reluctantly drawn to the director. But that's just the beginning. The Pride and Prejudice echoes take place on at least three levels, the wit is wonderful, and the ending quite satisfyingly romantic.
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on 25 April 2000
I soon forgot about the Pride and Prejudice connection while I was reading this book. It was just downright funny, splashed with Northern humour (?), and a hysterical ending. The language of the book takes a bit of getting used to, but don't let that put you off. Read it!
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on 16 November 1999
I haven't found many 'sequels' or 'parallels' that were worth the effort of reading; anyone who's asked me about them, will know well my views on Emma Tennant's versions! Lions & Liquorice is a rather original re-look at P&P - with the gender of the main characters reversed. Re-working Elizabeth Bennet as a man was a very risky venture, and for the most part this book carries the idea rather well. It's based around a film set, which allows some 'liberties' with a modern setting that otherwise wouldn't have worked so well. The only critism is that the ending is a bit pat; something more like the way 'Clueless' handled Emma would have been better, but I liked it anyway.
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on 28 March 2000
I would reccomend this book to anyone who loves Jane Austen. The setup can be kind of difficult to understand, at first, but eventually starts to make sense. If you become confused by which character is which..don't worry! Sometimes I felt the characters could have been a little stronger. Also, the ending was a little weak. Other then that, the book was very enjoyable.
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on 9 December 1999
It's That Woman from Baltimore's fault (the reviewer likely above mine). Turns out she's a writer I like, and she was quite happy with this recursive treatment of Pride & Prejudice. I bought it on her recommendation.
It was "good enough" until I arrived at page 171, wherein the beauty of the language suddenly opened up a view into the character's mind, and I wanted MORE.
I admit to confusion over the story within the story, until I ascertained the setup.
I was not disappointed in the parallels to Pride and Prejudice--it was very nicely done in a modern setting, and I will foist it on many of my friends, unlike some "sequels" or "in the style of" books. I even liked it after I figured in postage to the US and currency conversion rates.
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