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on 23 April 2017
Just loved reading this book, got totally immersed in Mr Elms reminisces of his childhood ubringing, one for the connissuer of clothing throughout the ages, lived it myself..This book is as good as it gets, a socialogical, cultural and look back to the past insight into the way we were (wore)
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on 20 September 2017
Very interesting read about the 60s, 70s, 80s etc and a lot of insights into the various origins of many music scenes around London
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on 5 April 2017
It reminds me of my youth
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 26 August 2006
I am not particularly fussed about clothes but thoroughly enjoyed Robert Elms's touching and wonderfully written autobiography. Clothes - and Elms's obsession with them - are lovingly chronicled in some detail. With each new subculture, or trend, came a new look or variation on a current look. Mods to skins to suedeheads to soul boys to punks etc etc. If you lived through this era and have any interest then you should enjoy this book. I must say I found it thoroughly absorbing but then I was an early punk and participated in the Billys/Blitz scene where Robert Elms played a starring role. One of the reviews on the back of the book makes a comparison with Nick Hornby's 'Fever Pitch', I think that's spot on. Just as you don't need to be a fan of Arsenal FC to enjoy Hornby's book so you don't have to be a clothes horse to enjoy this book. Well done Mr Elms, I doff my retro-velvet Stevie Wonder-style hat in your direction.
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on 22 December 2014
I didn't realize how much I cared about clothes until I read this book. It was like a stroll down memory lane. Some of the long lost memories, did we really think donkey jackets were a good look?, made me laugh out loud! A fantastic read, thanks Robert.
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on 21 July 2015
Enjoyed this book &, in particular, reliving the mod/skinhead fashions of the late 60's early 70's which I was very much a part of. Couldn't relate so much to the rest of the youth movements & thrir garb ie punks, new romantics, goths etc., but it was still interesting to read this from the perspective of someone who was very much at the centre of things. I'm a fan of Robert Elms, but my opinion was coloured & somewhat revised upon discovering mid-read that he doesn't rate The Beatles - oh well, I suppose there's always one!
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on 21 February 2006
THIS book goes way beyond merely talking about youth fashions: I found it to be a fascinating read, a social history written in the first person from a man who became clothes obsessed from an early age. Semi-biographicall the author talks about his background, his family and how youth culture, and always being seen in the right clothes gave young English kids a creative direction. Something that was uniquely their own. It coves three decades of innovation and ends with the sad truth, that, the latest must have thing is no longer dictated by the kids themselves. Like the Mods and Skinheads of the 60's or the Soul boys of the 70's but by the high street and music industry.
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on 18 January 2015
Great book brought back so many memories of things and places I had forgotten . Would
have been even better with a few photos.
P's I have just seen that Solatio are now remaking box top loafers in the next few months.
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VINE VOICEon 4 May 2006
Clothes as a metaphor for the times we live in - this is not the first time it's been done, but here Elms does it well and accurately, and if you can remember those times.

Elms was one of those kids many would have wanted to be - at the centre of things, but he has some nice self deprecating tales to tell while beautifully linking Clothes, politics, music and growing up

if your interests extend to the way you look (ed) then this is an excellent read. Those who are not will find it all very superficial no doubt - I loved it
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on 23 January 2012
I'm giving this book 4 stars although I felt it faded badly once he got to university but the first few chapters about a working-class bloke and the mod/skinhead/soulboy continuum are worth 4 stars alone they're that good. As you'd expect from a smart working class geezer the attention to detail is amazing but as is so often the case once the writer starts to hobnob with the stars everything tales off.And this is written by an ex-New Romantic!
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