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on 12 March 2017
Definitely one of the best rock bands ever! The conclusion is that it's definitely a tough existence being a member of such an outstanding outfit....
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on 3 December 2017
Really good read
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on 31 October 2014
Very informative and revealing book especially if you're a long time fan of led zeppelin,really enjoyed it
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on 30 August 2017
Brilliant book of rock n roll excess, in-fighting, black magic and resentment.
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on 4 May 2012
I was a bit reluctant to come to this book as having read classic rock magazine for years i have always found Mr Wall to be biased for Jimmy Page and blame Robert Plant for not giving Page what he wants and getting the band back together.
The book though gives a fair and impartial view of the band,yes he does hold Page in very high regard as he should be and credit must be given as he does not shy away from showing both sides of Page both good and bad.
At first the "inside thoughts" of each member of the band take some time to get used to but i found it a refreshing way to give background to all of the main players in the Zep story while getting straight into the history of the band.
The story of the band is given proper time and attention and it is full of great insights into how each album came into being...
I very much enjoyed the story of the band and how Mr Wall presented the book.
I am still in camp Plant though.
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on 27 September 2015
Great read for any proper fans, well worth it, won't be disapointed, Mick Wall is a great writer, great stuff
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on 21 November 2016
amazing book
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on 24 May 2017
Given as a present, but he is enjoying it
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on 20 October 2014
great book
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on 12 February 2016
As a Zeppelin fan of over 30 years' standing I have mixed feelings about this book. There is very interesting stuff in here dealing with "before and after" the band's career. I learned interesting things about the individual members' family backgrounds and upbringings, and about Jimmy's astonishingly successful career as a session musician through the 1960s. I also found out more about the ongoing relationships, dialogues and tensions between the surviving members (and specifically between Jimmy and Robert) over the long years since John Bonham's death and the band's demise in 1979. There is plenty here, too, about legendary manager Peter Grant - some of it disturbing, some of it sad, some of it very funny. Grant's personal downfall during the 80s was, of course, spectacular, but given what we know about the brutality and cynicism of his career I am still not quite sure why Wall concludes (in the acknowledgements to the book) that he "deserved better".

As an analysis of what really made Led Zeppelin tick, however, I came away disappointed, and feeling somehow that this very large book delivered less than it promised. I was shocked at how many specific anecdotes of rock'n'roll carnage and "bad behaviour" I had come across before - I read Stephen Davies Hammer Of The Gods back in 1984, and my impression is that many of the hoary old stories are repeated almost verbatim from that book. Déjà vu, over and over as the pages turned! Wall's written style seems to me elaborate and self-indulgent, with a love of long compound sentences rather than plain speech. I know you can't please everyone (!) but the italicised imagined "recollections" of the four band members that punctuate the book don't convince me at all, with swear words and "common speech" laid on with a trowel. The long chapter on Jimmy Page's interest in the occult obstructs the flow of the book while remaining (inevitably) pretty speculative.

This book would have been improved massively had it been subjected to a damned good, clear-eyed edit. An effective editor could have sorted out the many stylistic problems, shortened it somewhat, and also identified the many passages where Wall seems to slide (unconsciously I am sure) into something that verges upon plagiarism of Stephen Davis's earlier book. He or she would also have saved us from one absolute howler, the consistent mis-spelling of the title of Zeppelin's last album!
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