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on 23 July 2017
Great read
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on 17 October 2017
As a retired pre-digital engineer I found it fascinating.
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on 27 April 2017
GOOD
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on 15 March 2015
Its a great book, a little waffly at times and you do need to have a interest in the subject to be able to read it. i personally really enjoyed it and it has helped enormously with the first unit of a level physics.
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on 5 November 2017
A really well written book that even a mathematical dunce like me could understand (to an extent). Our universe is a wondrous place!
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on 26 July 2017
Well written and makes the "hard" concepts easy to understand. Especially kind to the innumerate folk.
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on 26 September 2014
MAKES COMPLEX IDEAS UNDERSTANDABLE
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on 8 October 2017
Brian Cox. God. End of!
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on 22 May 2010
This is a great book, its easy to read and follow. Its written in the same style that Brian talks, in a passionate, knowledgeable yet still accessible way. The explanations are clear and logical. The book explains complex ideas in a user friendly way without dumbing down the content. If you are looking for a book that explains why e=mc2 then this is probably the one for you.
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on 3 February 2017
Like many people I suspect, I dived into Stephen Hawking's 'A brief history of time' with gusto, only to find myself completely lost after the initial chapters had so compellingly grabbed my attention, lulling me into a false sense of security as the complexity of the science and theories ramped up to a level far beyond the comprehension of mere mortals such as I. This book achieved something of the same effect, but in reverse.

It may be that this is as clear and simple a review of the steps leading to einstein's world-changing and brain-bending theories as is feasible without dumbing down the content, however this short book nevertheless seems more intent on provoking wonder at the beauty and insight of science than on conveying the ideas with the clarity of expression required for a true layman. Personally I found quite a lot of the material hard to follow, as it jumped around between complex equations, bizarre yet entertaining thought experiments, and straight-up history of science. Nonetheless the latter part of the book does a far better job of walking through general relativity than the previous sections on special relativity and quantum mechanics. Elsewhere, in their eagerness not to abandon the maths, and in their enthusiasm for the subject, for me the authors lost something of their purpose: I felt a little lost at many points. When they focused purely on the content of the theories, they were much easier to understand.

Yet some of the images used, such as the topographical representation of a journey through the landscape of spacetime, and the elevator thought experiment to explain gravity, were brilliant and generated the oft-quoted 'Ionian enchantment' (you'll have to trust me on that!) and it was definitely an engaging and stimulating read, with a nice conversational style, plenty of geeky humour and colourful cultural references. There is enough content to have materially shifted my understanding of the subject and I enjoyed the read, so I am recommending this and giving it 4/5.

I respect the authors for wanting to take the reader, as far as possible, through the journey of the underlying science. Paradoxically, I have found Brian Cox's more recent TV series far more 'dumbed down' and incoherent. I can't help feel there should be a midpoint in between the two and if anyone can do it, professor Cox is the man!
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