Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
1,354
4.8 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 12 May 2017
I found this book thoroughly engrossing and had difficulty in putting it down. I ended up with the greatest respect and admiration for Mr Marsh. His description of the operations was really entertaining and I found myself living every moment of them, successes as well as failures. A brilliant surgeon and man as well. He outlines all that is wrong with the NHS (administration and duplicated paperwork) as well as all that is good (nurses and doctors). A brilliant read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 September 2015
Interesting read
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 February 2017
Overwhelming if you read too much in one sitting. Stark, bold and brutally honest. Not one to read if you have surgery on the horizon though. A gem.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 April 2017
A great incite into the medical profession. I knew nothing about brain surgery and found the book absolutely fascinating. This genre would not be my usual reading matter, I experienced all manner of feelings from absolute shock to the other extreme of laughter. Mr Marsh holds no punches, do not always expect a happy ending as this is not fiction but reality. A must read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 August 2014
An incredibly well written, brutally honest book that I think should be recommended reading for everyone who is about to be operated on and everyone who has criticised the NHS or a doctor. He opens the door onto a world that is vitally important to all of us and yet is poorly understood by most people. What an incredibly difficult, and often misunderstood, job he does. It takes a rare collection of qualities to do what he does and I can see that doesn't always coincide with a warm, empathetic personality: some of the best surgeons can have the worst interpersonal skills. He clearly is a very compassionate man but has to hide it under layers of self-protecting shell. I'm not medical, and not a great reader of biographies, but I found this a hard-to-put-down read. My wife IS medical and it has helped me understand what she goes through and much of what he says about management and NHS culture chimes with her so I have no doubt he is being fair. Whatever. It's simply a great read, well written, and full of all sorts of insights.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 April 2017
Bought as a present
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 May 2016
Condition just OK
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 February 2015
The powerful message delivered by Marsh in this compelling book is that doctors do not possess miraculous powers or abilities- they are like the rest of us in our daily work - merely human, striving for the best outcomes often under difficult circumstances.

Like the most conscientious public service professionals, Marsh is often wracked with self doubt, guilt, frustration and is prone to self flagellation. Whilst you are left in no doubt of his outstanding technical abilities as a surgeon what most impresses itself upon the reader is his humility, compassion and humanity- qualities of equal importance.

His early experiences in caring for geriatric patients and time as a junior doctor give a valuable insight into the development of the man and his progression from naïve medical student to eminent consultant. This is a journey of success, failure, arrogance and hubris that will be familiar to many professionals though fortunately for most, without the potential life changing implications for others that neurosurgeons are faced with on a daily basis.

Also familiar to many readers will be the recurrent theme of political intervention into the professional world- be it Working Time Directives, Health Trusts and their minions of managers, Private Finance Initiatives or government targets.

In discussing his work with the National Institute for Clinical Excellence,Marsh chillingly contrasts the compassion of the medical world with that of business and government which seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of medical treatment in terms of game theory and utilities which calculate `Quality Adjusted Life Years.'

This brilliant book has as much to say about our humanity as it has about brain surgery.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 March 2017
Very good
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 April 2014
A wonderful and sometimes distressing look into the life of a truly gifted man, Henry Marsh tells it like it is.. warts and all. He explains in easy to understand language the process of treating various different brain disorders and recounts with touching honesty some of his successes and also his failures. He reveals the joys, the fears and often the frustration that his career within the N.H.S. has brought him and he does all of this with humour and humility.
I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in neurosurgery and the workings of the human brain whether they are from a medical background or not. My own reasons for reading this book? well they come in the form of my husband and my brother, who have both been successfully treated by Mr Marsh, to whom I will be eternally grateful.
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)