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4.6 out of 5 stars
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4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 17 October 2013
An evolutionary theory of exceptional brilliance, first proposed by Max Westenhofer in 1942, further developed by Alister Hardy in 1960 and then in 1997 by the wonderful Elaine Morgan. Hers is a really excellent presentation of the theory and her writing skill makes it even more plausible and enjoyable than her predecessors. This is the outstanding legacy left for us by a very special woman, who passed away in July of this year at the age of 92.
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on 17 November 2016
One of those theses which make you go 'Doh!' - of course! Incredible how long it has taken for Morgan's work to be still only half heartedly accepted by the establishment. Easy to read, she marshalls reams of scientific evidence and common sense reasoning clearly and systematically.
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on 25 May 2004
What is most startling about this excellent book are the lengths to which apparently reputable scientists will go to in inventing increasingly elaborate and far-fetched theories about how we came to be so different. And I don't mean the aquatic ape theory! After reading this, you really wonder why people are still thinking up convoluted stuff about thermal regulation and mechanisms that seem to rely on evolution haing access to a crystal ball. Why, when there is such an elegant, consistent, and complete explanation that fits so perfectly with the hard evidence? I always thought science was about finding theories to fit the facts, not selecting facts to fit your own theories! Elaine has done the right kind of science here.
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on 24 October 2016
The evidence produced in this book is fairly convincing. A recent BBC 4 programme presented by David Attenborough added to the evidence in that the only other mammals which are born with a waxy cover on their skin apart from Homo Sapiens are aquatic mammals including seal pups.
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on 10 December 2013
An interesting read on a controversial subject. The scientific is hell bent on dismissing this theory, while certain aspect of it seem like a bit of a stretch some other very much valid point are raised by Elaine Morgan. To read if you have an open mind.
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on 6 February 2013
How come there are still those who cannot see thr obvious, that we as biological beings spent a long time of our lives and thus evolution in the sea. Or rather along the beaches of the sea. Read it!
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on 27 October 1998
For anyone who has not been satisfied with accounts learned in school about human evolution and wants to learn about the aquatic ape hypothesis, this book is a must. Elaine Morgan objectively looks at existing theories about human evolution and calmly but systematically dismisses them. She then compiles an impressive list of biological evidence that suggests humans went through an aquatic phase. Never emotional and (for me) lacking a degree of passion, she lets the evidence do the arguing for her.
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on 9 January 2006
When I first heard about the aquatic ape theory I was intrigued, however when I started reading this book I became disappointed. The author seems to have a bitter undertone which comes through in the way that she writes the book, and I can understand this given how she is regarded by the scientific community. However I would have preferred it if Morgan had given a more balanced view instead of knocking her competitors down at the first hurdle. To make it clear I do think the aquatic ape theory is credible (and absolutely fascinating!) but I felt I needed to take this book with a pinch of salt- especially when the book talked about bipedalism in dinosaurs (true of the theropods, but trace fossils suggest hadrosaurs walked on four legs and ran on two; also dinosaurs ALL had legs tucked directly beneath their bodies, as one of the DEFINING characteristics). Some of the arguments within this book did not seem very well debated, and were maybe more of an afterthought- having said that there are places within this book where you can tell a lot of research has been done.
Overall I felt that I was unable to take this book seriously, and maybe I expected too much from it in the first place. The end of the book does feel rushed and maybe the chapters on tears/sweat could be a bit more coherant. Probably enjoyable if you have not read many other science-based books, otherwise I suggest looking elsewhere for explanations of the hypothesis (and it is worth it).
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on 7 November 2014
Outstanding, really gives the orthodox community pause for thought as they clearly don't know everything and are shown to be inflexible in their own views.
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on 15 July 2013
Well written and compelling argument by a clearly very intelligent and articulate author. Many of her hypotheses make a lot of sense.
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